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Would you like all of B5 on a single disk?

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  • #16
    Blu-Ray's replacement?
    Heck, blu-ray has not replaced the current DVD standard, and is not clear whether it or HD-DVD will do it...

    Supposedly both of those proposed new standards give a bit more image resolution in High Definition TV sets, but not enough to be that noticeable or important unless you had the highest end home theater system, according to an article I read about them in the New York Times a few months ago.

    I'll keep my wallet closed until one of those becomes sufficiently established.
    Such... is the respect paid to science that the most absurd opinions may become current, provided they are expressed in language, the sound of which recalls some well-known scientific phrase
    James Clerk Maxwell (1831-79)

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    • #17
      I've seen the readers digest version of the Tech change for the increase in data capacity.

      In short, current CD & DVDs are covered with tiny "pits" that reflect a laser. Each pit holds I Bit of data.
      The bottom of each pit is essentially Flat.
      The increase in data capacity would come from a new method of burning the pits so that they are no longer Flat, but contain multiple "Facets".
      Each facet added to a pit would allow another Bit of data to be recorded.

      The challenge in developing this is finding the "optimum" number of Facets and deciding just How to scan them.
      The Lasers would have to become more accurate because the data surface would be much smaller.
      Then, someone would have to find out if it is possible to read All the facets with a single laser or if Multiple Lasers would need to be coordinated and aligned.

      So far, it's all just theory.
      It works in the Mathmatics.
      Actually Building one is what is estimated to take at least 5 years.
      Engineering that precise takes a lot of practice.

      Then, they have to make them durable enough to stand up to the average Moron who drops it on the floor and complains when it stops working.

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      • #18
        I would love to have all of babylon 5 on one disk now that would be great.

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        • #19
          So would I, but it would become a safety issue at that point. I mean, I would be forever forgetting the little things while I go through the DVD, like: sleeping, eating, working, you know, trivial stuff.

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          • #20
            Here is a question: Why don't they put stuff on and make players for those USB portable hard drive thingies? Can't some of them hold more than a DVD? CMIIW.
            Recently, there was a reckoning. It occurred on November 4, 2014 across the United States. Voters, recognizing the failures of the current leadership and fearing their unchecked abuses of power, elected another party as the new majority. This is a first step toward preventing more damage and undoing some of the damage already done. Hopefully, this is as much as will be required.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Z'ha'dumDweller
              Here is a question: Why don't they put stuff on and make players for those USB portable hard drive thingies? Can't some of them hold more than a DVD? CMIIW.
              I can think of two reasons:
              a. Too expensive.
              b. Too new.

              The price of hard disk disks able to contain an entire series is coming down.
              IBM 120GB USB 2.0 External Hard Drive. Aluminum Design
              IBM 120GB 7200RPM Hard Drive 8MB buffer with PCT USB 2.0 Interface External Enclosure.

              $125.00
              Hard drives with USB connectors have only been on the market for a couple of years. We are probably in for a remake of the VHS cassette story; the studios will only get interested when the pirates demonstrate how to make money from them.
              Andrew Swallow

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Andrew_Swallow
                I can think of two reasons:
                a. Too expensive.
                b. Too new.

                The price of hard disk disks able to contain an entire series is coming down.


                Hard drives with USB connectors have only been on the market for a couple of years. We are probably in for a remake of the VHS cassette story; the studios will only get interested when the pirates demonstrate how to make money from them.
                I mean those little ones that have a hole in them to use as a keychain. It would be like a data crystal on B5...a small, pocketable, storage device.
                Recently, there was a reckoning. It occurred on November 4, 2014 across the United States. Voters, recognizing the failures of the current leadership and fearing their unchecked abuses of power, elected another party as the new majority. This is a first step toward preventing more damage and undoing some of the damage already done. Hopefully, this is as much as will be required.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Z'ha'dumDweller
                  I mean those little ones that have a hole in them to use as a keychain. It would be like a data crystal on B5...a small, pocketable, storage device.
                  The same reasons apply. Flash memory sticks have only just got the storage capacity to contain an entire 3 hour film.

                  Possible markets for these memories are moving vehicles, campers and military in temporary camps.
                  Andrew Swallow

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                  • #24
                    Given the film industry paranoia about piracy I don't think they'd ever distribute the films in flash drives.
                    Even if their cost is going down they are still too expensive anyway, and since they are designed as read/write media for data, while most entertainment content (music or video) is in read-only media it doesn't seem like a good match for mass distribution.
                    But for private copies it is a good idea.
                    Such... is the respect paid to science that the most absurd opinions may become current, provided they are expressed in language, the sound of which recalls some well-known scientific phrase
                    James Clerk Maxwell (1831-79)

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                    • #25
                      And speaking of the devil http://neasia.nikkeibp.com/wcs/leaf/...bt/news/335216
                      Sleeping in Light-----Darnit! Shut the Window.

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                      • #26
                        Okay...this goes back to my PC thread...do I wait for this innovation and do I go for an internal HD-DVD or Blu-ray? Or will we have to wait for a better answer? Remember, I want this new compy to last until 2010.
                        Recently, there was a reckoning. It occurred on November 4, 2014 across the United States. Voters, recognizing the failures of the current leadership and fearing their unchecked abuses of power, elected another party as the new majority. This is a first step toward preventing more damage and undoing some of the damage already done. Hopefully, this is as much as will be required.

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                        • #27
                          Really hard to say,this BluRay is so new we dont have any benchmarks to see how it can handle medias.
                          I don't know what to tell you,today's dvd burners are pretty cheap i guess that BluRay will be very expansive at first (not to mention the media itself).
                          Sleeping in Light-----Darnit! Shut the Window.

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                          • #28
                            Okay...this goes back to my PC thread...do I wait for this innovation and do I go for an internal HD-DVD or Blu-ray? Or will we have to wait for a better answer? Remember, I want this new compy to last until 2010.
                            The Blu-Ray and HD standards have yet to even break into public market. DVD-ROM drives on computers are only just now becoming commonplace and/or required, at least... 6-8 years after DVDs were first produced. I think you're safe.
                            Radhil Trebors
                            Persona Under Construction

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                            • #29
                              And yet more news http://www.pcworld.idg.com.au/index....27;fp;2;fpid;1
                              Sleeping in Light-----Darnit! Shut the Window.

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                              • #30
                                If you do not make a thing backwards compatible then people have to buy both it and its predecessor. This is both expensive and unpopular. Frequently with a bit more thought a compatible mode can be added. (Something I have done several times in my own work.)
                                Andrew Swallow

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