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  • #16
    Originally posted by WorkerCaste
    So, how do people listen? CD, tape, MP3? Also, how do you get you books. I do tapes for portability reasons, and I get my books through a NetFlix-like arrangement with Recorded Books.
    well at the moment i have a good 120 plus gigs of books on my harddrive that i can stick on my ipod, cds work too and of course the tradtional tape, also there is the library of congress' tape system for the blind or impared they are 4 sided tapes that require a special device to listen to. unfortunatly the readers for them are not the best in the world but they do have books avalible that and note really avalible in other places

    and i have on occastion rented from recorded books, blackstone audio, brillance corp, books-on-tape

    other sources are isis, audible.com, booksamillion.com

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Lunan
      i imagine that people may share your view or mine or have another entirely, but what do you think of audiobooks and why?
      Audiobooks in general, or Anne Rice books?

      I sometimes listen to audiobooks. Occasionally I'll put one on my iPod and listen to it while I'm out walking my dog around the neighborhood. Not always, though, I'm more of a music person in regards to my iPod. And it also depends upon who the narrator is. See, I don't like Muller's voice, for example. But Jim Dale I loved.

      My earlier comments about the Rice books was just an excuse for me to slam her. Which I enjoy doing. Pretentious, overrated, hack softcore vampire erotica bullshit. What's genuinely sad is that Laurell K. Hamilton started out as a decent writer with her Antia Blake series, but has since devolved into basically a more hardcore hack version of Rice. Just so dreadfully awful. Those later Blake novels aren't fit to wipe your ass with.
      "I don't find myself in the same luxury as you. You grew up in freedom, and you can spit on freedom, because you don't know what it is not to have freedom." ---Ayaan Hirsi Ali

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Garibaldi's Hair
        You might find that Jim Dale is also a "British Guy".

        And fairly open about it as well.

        After seeing Goblet of Fire, I was pretty jazzed for more Harry, so I went to the library and picked up Order of the Phoenix and Half-Blood Prince, and listened to them while commuting in my car.

        It's the only way to read.
        Only a fool fights in a burning house.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by WorkerCaste View Post
          I'm not trying to pick a fight or anything, but can you say more about what comess across differently to you. Again, it's just curiosity. I read the first few books of the series before I listened, and the latter ones I listened before I read. I didn't really get anything different from the books per se. Of course, even when I read now I hear Jim Dale's characterizations in my head. BTW, you can find out more about Jim Dale here. Rather interesting man.

          I think the George you're talking about for The Moon is a Harsh Mistress is George Wilson. Listened to him for about 15 minutes, rewound and returned the audiobook to the library.
          I tried listening to several things read by Lloyd James. To me, he sounds like a college kid trying to pick up a few bucks by reading. He mumbles, reads too fast and with no characterization. Pathetic. Too bad he seems to have the corner on Heinlein audio books.

          I listened to Wilson's "The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress" and thought it was pretty good. At least he sounds like something other than a kid. His voice has a bit of force behind it.

          A matter of taste I guess.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Rock-Knock View Post
            I tried listening to several things read by Lloyd James. To me, he sounds like a college kid trying to pick up a few bucks by reading. He mumbles, reads too fast and with no characterization. Pathetic. Too bad he seems to have the corner on Heinlein audio books.

            I listened to Wilson's "The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress" and thought it was pretty good. At least he sounds like something other than a kid. His voice has a bit of force behind it.

            A matter of taste I guess.
            Welcome Rock-Knock. Have you ever listened to George Guidall, Simon Prebble, Patrick Tull or Frank Muelller? They are some of my favorites. Actually, with George Wilson, I have listende to other books narrated by him and thought he did OK. It was just something with Moon that put me off.
            "That was the law, as set down by Valen. Three castes: worker, religious, warrior."

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            • #21
              Originally posted by WorkerCaste View Post
              Welcome Rock-Knock. Have you ever listened to George Guidall, Simon Prebble, Patrick Tull or Frank Muelller? They are some of my favorites. Actually, with George Wilson, I have listende to other books narrated by him and thought he did OK. It was just something with Moon that put me off.
              i know people are going to kick me for this but demonoid.com has a very good collection of audiobooks avalible including some that are not avalible thru anyother means (yes i know i'm gonna get kicked)

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Lunan View Post
                i imagine that people may share your view or mine or have another entirely, but what do you think of audiobooks and why?

                Well..I've really never gone through audiobooks. I did for Steven Hawking's A Brief History of Time, because I figured I would never read that and wanted to get through it cuz the subject matter interested me. That was really worthwhile, I feel, educationally. But I haven't done it for novels. I did however get my parents Atlas Shrugged on audio, because of its length, I knew they wouldn't read it. And they won't stop talking about it now. So I suppose that one's a good one.
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                • #23
                  I tried audio books once or twice but I kept falling asleep and would miss chunks of the story. At least with a book I can pick up where I left off. I would try it again, but probably if it was the only way to get the books I wanted.
                  Flying around the room under my own power.

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                  • #24
                    I love my audiobooks. It helps with pronunciation and I can listen while ironing, doing the dishes, cleaning the house and windows, painting or wallpapering. But definitely not in bed. I'm gone as soon as my head hits the pillow.
                    Understanding is a three-edged sword: your side, their side and the truth.
                    John Sheridan

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                    • #25
                      I've not been into audiobooks at all, though I might pick up a copy of Jackie Mason's book "Schmucks! Our Favorite Fakes, Frauds, Lowlifes, Liars, the Armed and Dangerous, and Good Guys Gone Bad" actually read by Jackie Mason.

                      Simply because, I think any book that's written by a comedian would be much better if you hear it read by them instead of simply reading it.
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                      • #26
                        Sorry, have I missed a point here?

                        How exactly is listening to a tape, CD, MP3, etc... to be considered, in any way shape or form, reading a book?

                        To my mind it misses out on the whole experience of actually having a book in your hands. The feel of the volume, the weight of the paper, the knowledge that this collection of pages is a doorway into another person's imagination that they have gone through the trouble of writing down for you, the smell of the paper, the expectation of turning each page to find out what is happening, none of these are present. Also, I have found that the very act of reading strengthens my mental muscles, my vocabulary increases, my imagination is engagedm, my ability to read - in and of itself - is improved.

                        Don't get me wrong, I have tried audio books. They just leave me cold. There is no sense of wonder. They strike me as...dare I say...? A little bit in the direction of the lazy end of the literary spectrum.
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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by WillieStealAndHow View Post
                          I've not been into audiobooks at all, though I might pick up a copy of Jackie Mason's book "Schmucks! Our Favorite Fakes, Frauds, Lowlifes, Liars, the Armed and Dangerous, and Good Guys Gone Bad" actually read by Jackie Mason.

                          Simply because, I think any book that's written by a comedian would be much better if you hear it read by them instead of simply reading it.
                          Orson Scott Card has actully said that he writes his books to be READ ALOUD in some audio form, i thought that was very interesting (especially since he does some of the reading for the ender's books)

                          as to having a book in hand smelling feeling reading, yes i agree its not an experiance to miss, however there are some books i CAN NOT read but i CAN listen to and enjoy greatly (the davinci code for example, or several of dick francis' books)

                          i also really enjoy reading a book then listening to it, i find i get 2 seperate feels from that from time to time.

                          and of course time is a consideration

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                          • #28
                            @ LightStorm

                            I really can understand your point. As for german books I feel the same. The only reasons I listen to german audio data is with comedians (cabaret or satirical shows). You just cannot get their way of saying things into a book. But with novels or study books nothing can beat paper (well, maybe there will be a kind of electronic book sometime, but as of now nothing really useable is here).

                            BUT when I try to get novels in e.g. english I sometimes have a hard time reading. It might be worth it (like with Douglas Adams, whose work is *MUCH* more fun in the original), but it takes a lot of energy. There it is easier to listen to a audio book, where a native speaker reads it aloud, and so gives me more energy to focus on the content. It is kind of lazy, true 8-)

                            PeAcE
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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by LightStorm View Post
                              Sorry, have I missed a point here?

                              How exactly is listening to a tape, CD, MP3, etc... to be considered, in any way shape or form, reading a book?

                              To my mind it misses out on the whole experience of actually having a book in your hands. The feel of the volume, the weight of the paper, the knowledge that this collection of pages is a doorway into another person's imagination that they have gone through the trouble of writing down for you, the smell of the paper, the expectation of turning each page to find out what is happening, none of these are present. Also, I have found that the very act of reading strengthens my mental muscles, my vocabulary increases, my imagination is engagedm, my ability to read - in and of itself - is improved.

                              Don't get me wrong, I have tried audio books. They just leave me cold. There is no sense of wonder. They strike me as...dare I say...? A little bit in the direction of the lazy end of the literary spectrum.
                              I think a lot depends on what you think the critical elements of "reading" are. Holding the book and feeling the pages -- for me, I can't think that's too important at all. I don't see how experiencing a book on audio makes the writing less of a gateway into another person's imagination. Their imagination lies in the story and the characters. Writers do not expect you to experience the pages, they expect you to experience the words. Page composition varies by the format of the book. The writer generally has no idea what the pages will look like. The words they selected are still the words you experience. As far as the writer going to the trouble of "writing" them down for you, it's not as if the product in the book comes directly from their hands. Some authors even dictate. The don't select the grade of paper used, and since different versions of the book can use different grades of paper, it isn't a consistent experience anyways. The expectation of turning each page is replaced with the expectation of what will come next, and in many respects audio books do better at ensuring that the anticipation and author's intent are fully realized. How often, when reading a book, are you so intent on learning an outcome that you begin to skim in order to get to the "good part." Perhaps you don't do that, but most of the readers I know do it to some extent. I have certainly been guily of it. It is much harder to hurry an audio book, though. Sure, you can fast forward, but you can't be sure you haven't jumped the very part you're looking for. So, in the end, you generally hear every word of the book. Coming to the topic of strengthening mental muscles, I don't see any great lack in experiencing a book through audio. You must still use your imagination to visualize the settings and the characters. You still use your intellect to try and anticipate the story. You still engage your emotions in a well written book. Your vocabulary can still benefit as you are introduced to new words (and you even get the correct pronunciation ) If it is a work of nonfiction, you must still draw your own conclusions and incorporate the work into your life experience. All this, and you still get the same story and characters that someone reading the book with their eyes gets.

                              To me, the last is what makes "reading" a book. It is using your mind. That can be done through either mechanical process -- sight or vision. Yes, different areas of the brain are invoolved in the mechanics. Yes, if the author has included illustrations you miss out on those (although secondary market versions of books often omit these). Everything else, though...

                              By your argument, a blind person can never truly experience books. Also, you might want to consider that "lazy" is generally considered an insulting term.

                              For the record, I read with both my eyes and my ears. I let the tool suit the job. If I am doing something that requires hands but not intellect, audio is a wonderful choice. If I am looking to sit in the sun and do nothing, I'll pick up paper. Ultimately I think they are co-equal and there is no truly wrong choice. In fact, I know of a number of authors who love audio books and are enthusiastic about audio versions of their works. I know of one, Elizabeth Peters, who makes a point of listening to the audio once Barabara Rosenblat records it. Certainly they don't seem to think it's an inferior way to experience books.
                              "That was the law, as set down by Valen. Three castes: worker, religious, warrior."

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                              • #30
                                I've been an avid book reader for 40+ years and have really only started listening to audio books in the last few months . . . and I love them! As long as you have a good reader, I certainly consider an unabridged audio book to be as good or in some cases better than the paper version. Listening to Neil Gaiman read "Stardust" certainly added to that book. I have returned a few audio books to the library (that's a great place to try audio books if you're not sure about them) when I haven't liked the reader, but aside from those occasions, audio books are a great way to pass my commuting time.

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