Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Of Accents and Pronounciation

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Originally posted by LessonInMachismo
    An ex-girlfriend (and lifelong friend) moved to Arkansas in 1994. I moved here four years later and she had picked up the accent in a terrible way. I don't really pick up accents. I didn't have a California accent after living there for twenty-three years. I almost speak in a monotone. That's not to say that I can't adapt to make the other person comfortable. I have vendors from Philly, Wisconsin and Minnesota, so I usually add a bit of their accent to my voice during our phone conversations.
    Not to nitpick, but monotone is a quality of pitch and inflection rather than accent. You might say that you speak an accentless speech, which is probably something very much like what they call "Standard American English." That's what actors (and classically-trained singers) learn. What's really interesting, though, is how much what's considered the "standard" American English accent has changed. There was a great program on PBS about this, and the name of it of course escapes me now. But they mentioned that in the 20s, 30s, 40s, it was kind of a Bostonian accent -- even upper class New Yorkers, like FDR, spoke with it, and when you went to the movies, that's what most the people on screen were speaking (think Katharine Hepburn). But to me, that's an accent! Unaccented American English is a bit like how Andreas spoke as G'Kar (how Andreas spoke as Andreas was midwestern American English -- and very different!).

    I know that I still speak SAE, long after my years of study in music and theater, because when I still worked in music publishing I was on the phone with people all over the world on a daily basis. And whether it was a native, or a displaced New Yorker, nearly no one I spoke with was able to peg my native city (Brooklyn). When I go back to New York now, the accents of my childhood friends and family is so sharp and strong, I feel like I have to wash my ears out after a few hours of speaking with them!

    Uh....go, Lost Tales!

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by AmyG
      Not to nitpick, but monotone is a quality of pitch and inflection rather than accent.
      I do both, actually. I tend to speak very quickly, too, and slow people ask me to repeat what I say because it's too much information to process.

      Unaccented American English is a bit like how Andreas spoke as G'Kar
      This is also called an "international accent." It's used by a lot of translators, such as the defector to Al Qaeda, Adam Gadahn. It's almost as if the person speaking is sucking in air as they speak.
      Recently, there was a reckoning. It occurred on November 4, 2014 across the United States. Voters, recognizing the failures of the current leadership and fearing their unchecked abuses of power, elected another party as the new majority. This is a first step toward preventing more damage and undoing some of the damage already done. Hopefully, this is as much as will be required.

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by LessonInMachismo
        This is also called an "international accent."...<snip>...It's almost as if the person speaking is sucking in air as they speak.
        I have no idea exactly what you think that would sound like, but intake of air would only affect the quality of the voice -- whether it sounds rough, or breathy, or silky -- and would have nothing to do whatsoever with accent. Accent is simply pronunciation.

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by AmyG
          I have no idea exactly what you think that would sound like, but intake of air would only affect the quality of the voice -- whether it sounds rough, or breathy, or silky -- and would have nothing to do whatsoever with accent. Accent is simply pronunciation.
          It is definitely used to achieve the affect of smoothness. The pronunciation of the words is as close to proper as one can get.

          The rednecks here laughed at me last year when I pronounced the word "soot" like the word used to describe formal apparel.
          Last edited by Dr Maturin; 08-27-2006, 07:36 PM.
          Recently, there was a reckoning. It occurred on November 4, 2014 across the United States. Voters, recognizing the failures of the current leadership and fearing their unchecked abuses of power, elected another party as the new majority. This is a first step toward preventing more damage and undoing some of the damage already done. Hopefully, this is as much as will be required.

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by LessonInMachismo
            It is definitely used to achieve the affect of smoothness. The pronunciation of the words is as close to proper as one can get.

            The rednecks here laughed at me last year when I pronounced the word "soot" like the word used to describe formal apparel.
            Yahbut, intake of air has nothing to do with how you...ah, forget it! You've actually worn me out (although I'm not conceding; not one iota).

            Incidentally, I'm loving the current avatar, LiM. Vic Mackey is da man!

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by AmyG
              Yahbut, intake of air has nothing to do with how you...ah, forget it! You've actually worn me out (although I'm not conceding; not one iota).
              The two sentences in the first reply in my last post in this thread were not related. Two entirely different points. I didn't mean to imply that it had anything to do with the accent, just that it was an additional feature that speakers of the "international accent" use frequently. There is an ejective every few words, too.

              Incidentally, I'm loving the current avatar, LiM. Vic Mackey is da man!
              We will see how he ends in two seasons. I have to guess that he will go out the JR Ewing way. Or maybe turn himself in to save someone else. I don't want to see him die the bad guy.
              Recently, there was a reckoning. It occurred on November 4, 2014 across the United States. Voters, recognizing the failures of the current leadership and fearing their unchecked abuses of power, elected another party as the new majority. This is a first step toward preventing more damage and undoing some of the damage already done. Hopefully, this is as much as will be required.

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by LessonInMachismo
                The two sentences in the first reply in my last post in this thread were not related. Two entirely different points. I didn't mean to imply that it had anything to do with the accent, just that it was an additional feature that speakers of the "international accent" use frequently. There is an ejective every few words, too.
                That (a frequent use of ejectives) also has nothing to do with standard American English -- which is an idealized dialect not really natively spoken anywhere in the US, but rather taught by accent/dialect coaches and acting teachers. Ejectives are used where they are proper to be used; that is, there are certainly regionalisms where plosive consonant sounds are 'swallowed' more than in other regions, and SAE would correct those. But it's not a feature, per se, of SAE that you have ejectives "every few words." You use them where they belong.

                As for the intake of air thing, I'm sure some people do it and some don't, but again, it isn't a feature of accent or dialect whatsoever.

                I'm wondering if we're speaking at cross purposes here because of a lack of common ground. Are you a native American English speaker? Or did you learn it abroad? I'm thinking, from your posts, that possibly you had someone teaching you English who had some strange ideas about how to produce the generic accent of SAE. In my case, I'm a native speaker who picked SAE up through many years of acting and singing (and training in acting and singing). And I can assure you, it's all about pronunciation. It doesn't matter how breathily you speak, or whether or not you use plosives frequently.

                Now, I'm sure Jan is going to chase us away to another thread if we keep this up, so let me just add that I think it's really exciting that JMS is starting to make deals with cast members for TLT!

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by LessonInMachismo
                  The rednecks here laughed at me last year when I pronounced the word "soot" like the word used to describe formal apparel.
                  Yes, but you can laugh right back at them when the use the same pronounciation to describe a group of connected rooms or a musical composition.

                  Joe
                  Joseph DeMartino
                  Sigh Corps
                  Pat Tallman Division

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by AmyG
                    That (a frequent use of ejectives) also has nothing to do with standard American English -- which is an idealized dialect not really natively spoken anywhere in the US, but rather taught by accent/dialect coaches and acting teachers. Ejectives are used where they are proper to be used; that is, there are certainly regionalisms where plosive consonant sounds are 'swallowed' more than in other regions, and SAE would correct those. But it's not a feature, per se, of SAE that you have ejectives "every few words." You use them where they belong.

                    As for the intake of air thing, I'm sure some people do it and some don't, but again, it isn't a feature of accent or dialect whatsoever.

                    I'm wondering if we're speaking at cross purposes here because of a lack of common ground. Are you a native American English speaker? Or did you learn it abroad? I'm thinking, from your posts, that possibly you had someone teaching you English who had some strange ideas about how to produce the generic accent of SAE. In my case, I'm a native speaker who picked SAE up through many years of acting and singing (and training in acting and singing). And I can assure you, it's all about pronunciation. It doesn't matter how breathily you speak, or whether or not you use plosives frequently.
                    I think we have a complete breakdown of communication here. I wasn't describing the proper use of sounds or articulation in any particular language or dialect; I was saying that I've noticed that I've noticed those characteristics are frequently featured by speakers of the "international accent."

                    Good day!

                    Recently, there was a reckoning. It occurred on November 4, 2014 across the United States. Voters, recognizing the failures of the current leadership and fearing their unchecked abuses of power, elected another party as the new majority. This is a first step toward preventing more damage and undoing some of the damage already done. Hopefully, this is as much as will be required.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      A gift from your Friendly Neighborhood Moderator--your very own thread to talk about talking.

                      (not trying to be a 'thread nazi', it just seemed to me that the TLT thread is likely to have a lot of non-regular visitors looking for real discussion about the DVD project and should probably stay more on topic).

                      Jan
                      "As empathy spreads, civilization spreads. As empathy contracts, civilization contracts...as we're seeing now.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Yousa say peepa gunna die???
                        "I don't find myself in the same luxury as you. You grew up in freedom, and you can spit on freedom, because you don't know what it is not to have freedom." ---Ayaan Hirsi Ali

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Karachi Vyce
                          Yousa say peepa gunna die???

                          Noooooooooo!!! Make it stop!!!!! ::kills George Lucas.::
                          Flying Sparks Web Comic - A Hero and Villain In Love. Updates on Wednesdays
                          True Believer Reviews: Comic Reviews and Interviews on Wednesdays and Fridays - Or Your Money Back!

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Jarjar rocks! its a hidden message to smoke Ganja (Ganga, Gungan... catch my drift?)

                            Lucas was Hi during Episode 1.
                            Sleeping in Light-----Darnit! Shut the Window.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              It's a shame most people weren't while watching it...

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by AmyG
                                It's a shame most people weren't while watching it...
                                True, but they were when it was being written.
                                ---
                                Co-host of The Second Time Around podcast
                                www.benedictfamily.org/podcast

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X