Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Of Accents and Pronounciation

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    704 Houston Street. It was either Astoria or Flushing, but definitely not Yonkers, because he lived in Queens. Yonkers isn't in Queens.

    To a non-native New Yorker, the correct pronounciation of "Houston Street" could easily sound like "Hauser Street," so I can understand your confusion. That's the way you can tell a real New Yorker, for example, if you're in a WWII foxhole and some Nazi is pretending to be American. Don't ask him who won the World Series that year; ask him how he pronounces H-O-U-S-T-O-N Street in Queens.

    Comment


    • #17
      According to the Wiki page for All in the Family:

      The fictional address of the Bunker home is 704 Hauser Street.
      Jan
      "As empathy spreads, civilization spreads. As empathy contracts, civilization contracts...as we're seeing now.

      Comment


      • #18
        One of many instances that prove to me that Wikipedia is a sketchy resource at best. I'd bet money on this one, people. The reason Wikipedia has that is because it's been erroneously listed as such on other All in the Family fan/info sites. It's a hearing problem. In New York, you pronounce "Houston Street" like this:

        HOW-stn Street

        So for someone who isn't a native, you can imagine that they would think that must be "Hauser," because who the heck pronounces "Houston" as anything other than HYOO-stn?

        But Wikipedia is never proof enough for me, as it shouldn't be for anyone when it's anything even remotely controversial.

        It's 704 Houston Street.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by B5_Obsessed
          I didn't say it was a real accent or a good one. But Conaway was definitely affecting on something, when he said "layers and layers of people's lives.."

          Just for clarity, I'm referring to "Sleeping in Light" only. Up until then, it was a NY accent. Not fuh nuthin'
          Okay, I just watched this bit. To these well-attuned Brooklyn-born ears, there was nothing amiss in that delivery. Didn't sound southern at all. The only thing that was slightly off was that he enunciated the "r" of "layers," both times, a leeeetle too much for pure Brooklyn...but not so much for a Manhattanite or a Bronxy.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by AmyG
            One of many instances that prove to me that Wikipedia is a sketchy resource at best. I'd bet money on this one, people. The reason Wikipedia has that is because it's been erroneously listed as such on other All in the Family fan/info sites. It's a hearing problem. In New York, you pronounce "Houston Street" like this:

            HOW-stn Street

            So for someone who isn't a native, you can imagine that they would think that must be "Hauser," because who the heck pronounces "Houston" as anything other than HYOO-stn?

            But Wikipedia is never proof enough for me, as it shouldn't be for anyone when it's anything even remotely controversial.

            It's 704 Houston Street.
            Definitely not Houston. It's AmyG against the world on this one.
            However, I was mistaken about Yonkers. I guess Maude lived in Yonkers.
            Dick Van Dyke lived in New Rochelle. Archie lived in Astoria on the fictional Hauser St. Which is funny, because I used to live on 48th Street in Astoria, back around the time of Beatlemania (the real one, not to be confused with the 70s Broadway show at the Lunt-Fontayne).
            Only a fool fights in a burning house.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by AmyG
              One of many instances that prove to me that Wikipedia is a sketchy resource at best. I'd bet money on this one, people. The reason Wikipedia has that is because it's been erroneously listed as such on other All in the Family fan/info sites. It's a hearing problem. In New York, you pronounce "Houston Street" like this:

              HOW-stn Street

              So for someone who isn't a native, you can imagine that they would think that must be "Hauser," because who the heck pronounces "Houston" as anything other than HYOO-stn?

              But Wikipedia is never proof enough for me, as it shouldn't be for anyone when it's anything even remotely controversial.

              It's 704 Houston Street.
              I hearby declare Wikipedia Rule #1:Wikipedia is only legitimate when it proves your point.
              ---
              Co-host of The Second Time Around podcast
              www.benedictfamily.org/podcast

              Comment


              • #22
                What I'm thinking, since so many of you are so convinced, and so many websites dispute me, is that perhaps the show changed the address sometime during the run of the series. Because I can remember being quite a small girl, watching with my parents from the very first episode (that was back in the days when there were many tv shows on the air that were suitable for the whole family to enjoy), and all of us laughing about how non-New Yorkers were probably thinking that their street was spelled "Howston" because of the way they pronounced it like the locals. Probably the only way to resolve this is to get the first season DVDs, or scripts.

                As for Wikipedia, you just can't trust it on many things due to edit wars.

                Comment


                • #23
                  The part I don't get is how Houston pronounced in *any* fashion could possibly be heard as Hauser. I mean, one ends in N and one ends in R.

                  But just to steer this back on topic:

                  Originally posted by milkman
                  http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20060821...dia_warner_dc_3

                  Quote:
                  Warner Bros. film studio on Monday unveiled a new division to make and distribute movies directly to DVD consumers - a first for the company - and it put a veteran marketing executive in charge of the group.

                  Im thinking this is how B5:TLT will be distributed.
                  Sounds reasonable. 'Bout time the entered even the 20th century. They dragged their heels about producing the VCR tapes and then again about releasing the DVDs. Somebody finally seems to have realized that there's money to be made.

                  Jan
                  "As empathy spreads, civilization spreads. As empathy contracts, civilization contracts...as we're seeing now.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by AmyG
                    What I'm thinking, since so many of you are so convinced, and so many websites dispute me, is that perhaps the show changed the address sometime during the run of the series. Because I can remember being quite a small girl, watching with my parents from the very first episode (that was back in the days when there were many tv shows on the air that were suitable for the whole family to enjoy), and all of us laughing about how non-New Yorkers were probably thinking that their street was spelled "Howston" because of the way they pronounced it like the locals. Probably the only way to resolve this is to get the first season DVDs, or scripts.
                    Sorry about re-hijacking this thread Jan!

                    But, in trying to back up what Amy was claiming about "Houston" Street, I seem to have come up with more support for "Hauser" Street.

                    From a short online biography of Carroll O'Connor

                    O'Connor "Said that he came up with the address for the Bunker family residence (704 Hauser Street) when he was driving to work in L.A. He happened to find himself on Hauser Blvd (few blocks from CBS TV City) and thought the name sounded like part of Queens, New York where Archie was supposed to live.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      I wouldn't tell a Texan to pronounce Houston more phonetically...

                      And I used to get pissed when out-of-staters would come to Cali and tell us that we're pronouncing the Spanish city and street names incorrectly. Damn it, it's "El dur-RAH-doh," not "El doh-RAH-doh." It's "man-TEE-kuh," not "mahn-TAY-kah."
                      Last edited by Dr Maturin; 08-23-2006, 08:50 PM.
                      Recently, there was a reckoning. It occurred on November 4, 2014 across the United States. Voters, recognizing the failures of the current leadership and fearing their unchecked abuses of power, elected another party as the new majority. This is a first step toward preventing more damage and undoing some of the damage already done. Hopefully, this is as much as will be required.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Sigh. NotSoWize, my heart is broken, and apparently my memory is, too!

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Stunning_in_Purple
                          Just a few replies to some different comments. To someone who has lived in the south her whole life, Zack does not sound southern. I think that actually Jeff Conway is from New York which would explain why he's played so many New Yorkerish characters. However, if you go to New Orleans, which is pretty dang south, you will be amazed. The majority of the natives sound like they're from Brooklyn! Explanation? Many, many years ago, a group of nuns came to New Orleans from New York to teach some of the black children how to read and the accent spread.
                          I am pretty sure -- I'd bet money, in fact -- that that's an urban legend. The socio-linquistic explanation I've heard is that much of the same European stock who came to New York at the turn of the last century also came to New Orleans around the same time. So in some neighborhoods of NOLA, the "yat" accent developed quite similarly to the NY boroughs accents, particularly Brooklyn's. So, being a cosmopolitan place with much of the same stock from the same era, of course the accents were going to develop similarly (yet not identically; I'm sure natives can hear the differences).

                          As for cell shading, I'm with Shabaz that it's an artistic effect intended to make things look less real than actual film/photos, yet more real than traditional animation. Maybe it's been put to good use elsewhere, but "Waking Life" made me want to throw my shoe through the theater screen.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Just because this has been bugging me:

                            I don't know from Brooklyn and Queens, but the best-known Houston Street (pronounced HOW-ston) in New York is in lower Manhattan. It is the northern boundary of the area known as "Soho" - originally "SoHo" and allegedly meaning "South of Houston Street". (The name came out of nowhere in the mid-60s and was obviously someone's attempt transplant the name from London to what was becoming a similarly bohemian part of New York.)

                            They have their own way of doing things in the Big Easy. They always have...

                            They have their own accent, which at its ripest sounds a little like Brooklyn and a little like Savannah; as rendered hereabouts, the name of their city is ''New AWL-yuns."' The New York Times November 24, 2000
                            I can't find anything to support the nun story, except variants of it equally disembodied in time and space - classic characteristics of an urban legend. I find it much more plausible that the similar accents are the result of immigration from similar areas at around the same times. Both New York (including Brooklyn, which was a separate city until 1898) and New Orleans were port cities with large Catholic populations (unlike many other American port cities of the 19th and early 20th centuries) and therefore attracted many of the Catholic immigrants who began arriving in large numbers from Ireland, Italy, Poland, and Germany at about this time. As Amy noted, similar populations will tend to produce similar blended accents. And even in adulthood people can be heavily influenced by the speech they constantly hear around them.

                            Most of my extended family, on both sides, is originally from lower Manhattan. The majority had moved to the Bronx by the early 1950s. One of my uncles, raised mostly in Manhattan and the Bronx, married a Queens girl and moved to Whitestone around 1955. But by the time I was old enough to notice such things, say 1965 or thereabouts, he had already adopted the characteristic "er" for "oi" ("terlet" for "toilet" "erl" instead of "oil" going into your crankcase.) All of his kids spoke the same way, even though none of the rest of the family did. His eldest son, in turn, married a girl from Tennessee and he moved to Memphis with her. We exchanged Christmas cards and the odd letter, but didn't see or speak with one another for about 7 or 8 years. Then one day he called me up out of the blue and I didn't have any idea who I was talking to at first. He had somehow overlaid a southern drawl onto his native Queens and ended up with the oddest accent I've ever heard. Think James Carville on valium. (Which, come to think of it, wouldn't be a bad idea - but I digress. )

                            Regards,

                            Joe
                            Joseph DeMartino
                            Sigh Corps
                            Pat Tallman Division

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              There was a cop from NO on the news today. Yes, the NO accent is definitely a combo of NY and a southern drawl. Most of the rest of LA and southern AR has the worst accent in America. I can't understand a word that they're sayin' (Hartman as Sinatra: It all came out as pops and clicks!) There's one guy at work who will call you on the phone and mumble on and on and I will just keep going "Yeah, uh huh" and finally ask him to send me an e-mail.

                              An ex-girlfriend (and lifelong friend) moved to Arkansas in 1994. I moved here four years later and she had picked up the accent in a terrible way. I don't really pick up accents. I didn't have a California accent after living there for twenty-three years. I almost speak in a monotone. That's not to say that I can't adapt to make the other person comfortable. I have vendors from Philly, Wisconsin and Minnesota, so I usually add a bit of their accent to my voice during our phone conversations.

                              Anyways...

                              BABYLON 5: THE LOST TALES~!
                              Recently, there was a reckoning. It occurred on November 4, 2014 across the United States. Voters, recognizing the failures of the current leadership and fearing their unchecked abuses of power, elected another party as the new majority. This is a first step toward preventing more damage and undoing some of the damage already done. Hopefully, this is as much as will be required.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                I must say, I don't know how we got into the whole New Orleans debate.
                                My question was purely rhetorical. To wit:

                                YES - Jeff Conaway, 56, was born in NY,NY (same as moi).
                                YES - Jeff Conaway, though likeable, will never win an Oscar.
                                YES - Jeff Conaway, in attempting to sound old and war-hardened,
                                dropped in a strange accent that may not exist anywhere on Earth (or space).

                                YES - NY and New Orleans accents have many similarities and differences (which I would attribute to the influx of Creole), but Dennis Quaid sucks at both.

                                Whenever I detect any drawl creeping into my voice, I take it out and beat it with a stick. However, I have retained little of my NY accent and come across fairly accent-neutral, unless I try to say the word "boardwalk".
                                Last edited by B5_Obsessed; 08-27-2006, 12:49 PM.
                                Only a fool fights in a burning house.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X