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  • Of Accents and Pronounciation

    Now the real question: Was Zack's southern drawl in the script?
    Only a fool fights in a burning house.

  • #2
    What southern drawl? I've lived in the South on and off for years (TX, LA and FL) and sure don't recognize that as any accent I've heard down here!

    Jan
    "As empathy spreads, civilization spreads. As empathy contracts, civilization contracts...as we're seeing now.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Jan
      What southern drawl? I've lived in the South on and off for years (TX, LA and FL) and sure don't recognize that as any accent I've heard down here!

      Jan
      I'll do you one better Jan. I have never lived in the South and never thought that Zack had a southern accent.
      ---
      Co-host of The Second Time Around podcast
      www.benedictfamily.org/podcast

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      • #4
        Yeah, southern Brooklyn, maybe.

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        • #5
          Yeah, I thought it was more of a New York accent. Of course, in parts of the South with names that sound a lot like "Miami", that may be the most common accent you'll find.

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          • #6
            I didn't say it was a real accent or a good one. But Conaway was definitely affecting on something, when he said "layers and layers of people's lives.."

            Just for clarity, I'm referring to "Sleeping in Light" only. Up until then, it was a NY accent. Not fuh nuthin'
            Last edited by B5_Obsessed; 08-21-2006, 08:28 PM.
            Only a fool fights in a burning house.

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            • #7
              Yeah ... he kinda sounded like a New York Taxi Driver.

              "If I could be a bird, I'd be a Flying Purple People Eater because then people would sing about me and I could fly down and eat them because I hate that song. " - Jack Handey

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              • #8
                Well, it ain't just that he was in "Taxi Driver"....the guy's from New York.

                As for B5_Obsessed's comment about the specific line, I'll have to listen to it, but nothing Zack said on the show ever sounded to me like anything but home-grown Brooklyn, and certainly if one line was said differently, it would have stuck out to me. Being Brooklyn-born and New York raised, I'm really sensitive to people getting the accent wrong on screen.

                But you might also note that one similarity between a classic New York accent and a classic southern US accent is the drawn-out quality of certain vowels. So, out of context, perhaps one phrase that Zack said might have been able to pass as a southern-accented phrase, but I think it's more likely that you aren't taking it into the context of the rest of his speech, and that it's exactly that way a New Yorker would say it.

                I'll try to pop in the DVD today and give it a listen.

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                • #9
                  http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20060821/...ia_warner_dc_3

                  Warner Bros. film studio on Monday unveiled a new division to make and distribute movies directly to DVD consumers - a first for the company - and it put a veteran marketing executive in charge of the group.
                  Im thinking this is how B5:TLT will be distributed.
                  Milkman
                  www.mhoc.net

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by AmyG
                    Well, it ain't just that he was in "Taxi Driver"....the guy's from New York.

                    As for B5_Obsessed's comment about the specific line, I'll have to listen to it, but nothing Zack said on the show ever sounded to me like anything but home-grown Brooklyn, and certainly if one line was said differently, it would have stuck out to me. Being Brooklyn-born and New York raised, I'm really sensitive to people getting the accent wrong on screen.

                    But you might also note that one similarity between a classic New York accent and a classic southern US accent is the drawn-out quality of certain vowels. So, out of context, perhaps one phrase that Zack said might have been able to pass as a southern-accented phrase, but I think it's more likely that you aren't taking it into the context of the rest of his speech, and that it's exactly that way a New Yorker would say it.

                    I'll try to pop in the DVD today and give it a listen.
                    Hehe, Jeff was in "Taxi", not "Taxi Driver". You talkin' to me?
                    By the way, I'm NYC born and currently in my 16th year of exile in the peninsular gulag of Florida. Conaway was trying to act old, but he threw on an accent that made him sound like Robert E. Lee. It always bugs me.
                    Only a fool fights in a burning house.

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                    • #11
                      I never thought Jeff sounded especially southern, just older and gruffer - maybe a tad slower. I'm just past the end of the Shadow War in my current pass of the DVDs, so I'll have to remember to listen a little closer when I come up to "SiL" again.

                      BTW, there actually are phonetic similarities between a Brooklyn accent and some southern accents, especially those of coastal Georgia. The relative speed at which people speak in the different regions tend to mask the similarities. There was a book a few years back that drew a linguistic map of the U.S. based on where in England the English-speaking colonists came from. Turns out that Brooklyn and Georgia both had significant influxes of populations from the same part of England in colonial times, and some pronunciations, idioms and other lingusitic characteristics survived in both places into modern times. A lot of the regional variations in American speech, arose from similar variations in English usage, and then evolved in semi-isolation because travel was so difficult and most people rarely travelled more than a few miles from where they were born.

                      Regards,

                      Joe
                      Joseph DeMartino
                      Sigh Corps
                      Pat Tallman Division

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by AmyG
                        Well, it ain't just that he was in "Taxi Driver"....the guy's from New York.

                        As for B5_Obsessed's comment about the specific line, I'll have to listen to it, but nothing Zack said on the show ever sounded to me like anything but home-grown Brooklyn, and certainly if one line was said differently, it would have stuck out to me. Being Brooklyn-born and New York raised, I'm really sensitive to people getting the accent wrong on screen.
                        Amy, you'll be happy to hear that in spite of my best intentions, my daughter has begun to develop a Brooklyn accent. This former Pittsburgher is saddened by this development.
                        ---
                        Co-host of The Second Time Around podcast
                        www.benedictfamily.org/podcast

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Joseph DeMartino
                          There was a book a few years back that drew a linguistic map of the U.S. based on where in England the English-speaking colonists came from.
                          That sounds pretty interesting - do you have a link to the book on Amazon, per chance?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by B5_Obsessed
                            Hehe, Jeff was in "Taxi", not "Taxi Driver". You talkin' to me?
                            Expatriate in Philadelphia for the past eighteen years, here.

                            And, I wasn't that off; the series "Taxi" was actually based on the film "Taxi Driver" (another case of a sitcom coming from a fairly serious film, like M*A*S*H).

                            BTW, there actually are phonetic similarities between a Brooklyn accent and some southern accents,
                            Yo, DeMartino, you say that like maybe I didn't know what I was talkin' about! Dem's fightin' woids!

                            And, thebaron, your daughter is obviously a child of infinite taste and refinement. Pronouncing "Houston" correctly will stand her in good stead, someday. <g> (Hint: Archie Bunker pronounced it correctly; it's the street he lived on in his fictional version of Queens.)

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                            • #15
                              Archie Bunker lived at 704 Hauser Street. In Yonkers, I believe.

                              I'm trying to imagine Judd Hirsch with a mohawk.
                              Only a fool fights in a burning house.

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