Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Audiobooks

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Audiobooks

    i am an avid audiobook listner going thru many a week, i'm curious as to what people think of audiobooks

    i personally prefer to read a book first then listen to it. i find i get some very diffrent things from each of the formats.
    how about the rest of you?

  • #2
    I think audio books are a wonderful thing for traveling- I picked up a Stephen King audio book when driving back to New Jersey from South Carolina, and listening to it really made the long trip go by more quickly. But given a choice between reading a book and listening to it, I'll take reading any time. Aside from the fact that I can read much faster than anybody can speak, I prefer my imagination to somebody else's voice. But that's just my opinion.

    Comment


    • #3
      I listen to books on my daily commute (45 to 60 minutes one way) and love them. It makes the time seem less wasted, and since it is essentially bonus time I end up "reading" books that I wouldn't have otherwise. With limited time to actually sit down with a book, I'll gravitate towards SF -- limited time you might as well go for your favorite, right? But with audiobooks and that bonus time I get to tackle other books I'm interested in: history, other non-fiction, mystery, historical fiction, etc.

      Have you got any favorite narrators? Here's some top notch ones I've run accross:

      George Guidall
      Barbara Rosenblat
      Simon Prebble
      Jim Dale
      Patrick Tull
      C. J. Crit
      Frank Muller

      A good narrator can lift a mediocre novel higher and a bad one can sink even a great novel.
      "That was the law, as set down by Valen. Three castes: worker, religious, warrior."

      Comment


      • #4
        Jim Dale is fantastic. Some of you may not be into the Harry Potter books because they're perceived of as for kids (although that's certainly arguable with the later books, given their dark and grim tone), but Jim Dale, who's narrated all six of the Potter books, is PHENOMENAL. He's given each character their own voice and personality.

        Not so much an audiobook, as in a direct reading of the text, but if anyone is a fan of Sherlock Holmes, you owe it to yourself to track down copies of the BBC radio productions (radio dramatizations) of Holmes, with Clive Merrison as Sherlock Holmes, and the late Michael Williams as Dr. John Watson. TREMENDOUS stuff. More info can be found here. Copies of the recordings can be bought off Amazon UK, I know, although you may be very lucky and your local library might have some in their audiobook collection. They've done all 60 of the Doyle Holmes canon. If you're a Holmes fan, it's worth it to own ALL of them.
        "I don't find myself in the same luxury as you. You grew up in freedom, and you can spit on freedom, because you don't know what it is not to have freedom." ---Ayaan Hirsi Ali

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by WorkerCaste
          I listen to books on my daily commute (45 to 60 minutes one way) and love them. It makes the time seem less wasted, and since it is essentially bonus time I end up "reading" books that I wouldn't have otherwise. With limited time to actually sit down with a book, I'll gravitate towards SF -- limited time you might as well go for your favorite, right? But with audiobooks and that bonus time I get to tackle other books I'm interested in: history, other non-fiction, mystery, historical fiction, etc.

          Have you got any favorite narrators? Here's some top notch ones I've run accross:

          George Guidall
          Barbara Rosenblat
          Simon Prebble
          Jim Dale
          Patrick Tull
          C. J. Crit
          Frank Muller

          A good narrator can lift a mediocre novel higher and a bad one can sink even a great novel.
          hit some on the head, Muller and Guidall are 2 of the all time best and may even be the best its unfortunate that frank had his accident as i was really looking foward to him doing all anne rice's vampire books, and you MUST find a copy of Guidall reading dune, its amazing
          jim dale
          anna feilds
          tony briton
          fullcast audio(gabrial de cur, stefrn rudnici, sally darling etc)
          dick hill
          michal prichard
          john rubinstien
          all great readers

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Lunan
            hit some on the head, Muller and Guidall are 2 of the all time best and may even be the best its unfortunate that frank had his accident as i was really looking foward to him doing all anne rice's vampire books, and you MUST find a copy of Guidall reading dune, its amazing
            It really was a shame with Frank. Brain damage affecting speech for a narrator is about as cruel as it gets. My favortie George Guidall is "Killer Angels." It's a fantastic book and George's reading is inspiring.
            "That was the law, as set down by Valen. Three castes: worker, religious, warrior."

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Karachi Vyce
              Jim Dale is fantastic. Some of you may not be into the Harry Potter books because they're perceived of as for kids (although that's certainly arguable with the later books, given their dark and grim tone), but Jim Dale, who's narrated all six of the Potter books, is PHENOMENAL. He's given each character their own voice and personality.
              Did you know that Jim Dale made the Guiness Book of World Records for his work on the Potter books? The most characterizations created. I understand he has to keep a library of clips for all the characters he's created, so when he's doing a new book, he refreshes himself on what he did for the character.
              "That was the law, as set down by Valen. Three castes: worker, religious, warrior."

              Comment


              • #8
                There is a stark difference between audio books (which are basically a recording of a book being read outloud) and audio plays.

                Not having a television set I listen alot to radio and radio drama.

                I also enjoy made for CD audio dramas like Big Finish productions.

                It's rare however for me to enjoy straight readings from books as I find my internal voice usually does the job well enough and having to listen to the reader gets in the way of bilding the images in my head.

                One notable exeption was the recently broadcast unabridged reading of "The Day Of The Triffids" on BBC Radio 7. The reader (Roger May) really managed to get his vocal cords around all the characters well, even the female ones and I was well and trully hooked on the story again.

                I m currently listening to their repeat broadcast of "Cold Comfort Farm" which is a real treat.
                Last edited by Shr'eshhhhhh; 08-16-2006, 12:50 PM.
                I have the wings for Bingo.

                Comment


                • #9
                  And really, within the world of audiobooks, there are narrations and performances. Narration is one, possibly two, narrators reading the book, while a performance uses a larger cast, still reading the book, but using different people for different voices in dialog. All have their place
                  "That was the law, as set down by Valen. Three castes: worker, religious, warrior."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Well, as a regular re-reader of Tolkein, I lost count how many times I had read Lord of the Rings over the years. This year I thought I'd try the Audiobook on my Ipod instead (just for a laugh)

                    I was surprised by how much I enjoyed it. However, its just another way for me to be lazy. Which , I guess is the point of all this modern technology.
                    *Den-Sha*

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Bonehead
                      Well, as a regular re-reader of Tolkein, I lost count how many times I had read Lord of the Rings over the years. This year I thought I'd try the Audiobook on my Ipod instead (just for a laugh)

                      I was surprised by how much I enjoyed it. However, its just another way for me to be lazy. Which , I guess is the point of all this modern technology.
                      Was it the Rob Inglis unabridged version? I actually own that. Every couple of years it comes out.
                      "That was the law, as set down by Valen. Three castes: worker, religious, warrior."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by WorkerCaste
                        Was it the Rob Inglis unabridged version? I actually own that. Every couple of years it comes out.
                        Yeah, that's the one
                        *Den-Sha*

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Ah but then there's the very lush BBC full cast radio versions of "Lord of The Rings" and "The Hobbit".

                          Wonderful stuff.
                          I have the wings for Bingo.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Shr'eshhhhhh
                            Ah but then there's the very lush BBC full cast radio versions of "Lord of The Rings" and "The Hobbit".

                            Wonderful stuff.
                            For me, I prefer "reading" the book with your ears instead of your eyes, if that makes any sense. I like having the full book rather than a radio version. I'm not knocking it -- I've actually heard some of it and they did a great job. I just prefer having the full book, and I find a single narrator less distracting. The characterizations by great narrators are more suggestive than forceful. To me I'm still reading the book with a mechanical change.
                            "That was the law, as set down by Valen. Three castes: worker, religious, warrior."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I still have fond memories of the Jackanory version of "The Hobbit" with the actors (many in the radio version) sitting in a circle (out of costume) reading their lines with a linking narrator.

                              It put me in mind of ancient bards telling stories around the camp fire.
                              I have the wings for Bingo.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X