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  • #16
    There's another, slightly different telling of it here:

    http://jmsnews.com/msg.aspx?id=1-15989&query=G'Kar's%20speeches

    Jan
    "As empathy spreads, civilization spreads. As empathy contracts, civilization contracts...as we're seeing now.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by Kris79
      If Babylon 5 and the words (not of the characters but...) of JMS can so profoundly touch me, I can only imagine how many other people the show reached.

      I am and will forever be eternally grateful....

      **OOOPS** Soz folks, way off subject then
      (meant to answer this earlier)

      Thanks for sharing that, Kris. While I agree that JMS's words are powerful alone, I think that sometimes what he illustrates in his stories is what's most likely to affect many more readers or viewers. First, of course, is because many more people read/watch his stories than ever hear or read what he says when speaking as himself. Secondly, I think that the situations that the characters deal with may resonate with people. For instance, I *so* wish I had several hundred copies of a particular issue of Midnight Nation - the one where people have fallen from the daylight nation to the midnight nation due to indecision and/or fear of taking action to change what they dislike about their lives. The final pages where there are many campfires with so many more people saying the same things the first group we saw is really powerful. First I'd thwack them upside the head with the issue , then I'd make them read it as often as necessary until they either got around to doing something or decided that the situation they were in was okay.

      If JMS's words and stories have changed me at all, it's been to help make me more likely to take action when I see that something I can do might help a situation, however slightly. Sometimes there's truly nothing one can do to directly help a situation, but there's often something that can help transmute negatives to positives in the world.

      Whew, see what you started?

      Jan
      "As empathy spreads, civilization spreads. As empathy contracts, civilization contracts...as we're seeing now.

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by Jan
        (meant to answer this earlier)

        Thanks for sharing that, Kris....

        If JMS's words and stories have changed me at all, it's been to help make me more likely to take action when I see that something I can do might help a situation, however slightly. Sometimes there's truly nothing one can do to directly help a situation, but there's often something that can help transmute negatives to positives in the world.

        Whew, see what you started?

        Jan
        Thanks Jan, and everyone else who has responded thus far. I still find it hard somedays to talk about it - so I generally find it easier to say in text. Not that the topic was meant to go down this road.

        So, sorry for that one people.

        I guess, as was said in Babylon 5, it is possible for one person to make a difference. Hell, if Sheridan can help change the face of a galaxy, then I'm sure you'll all agree that through B5, JMS helped (in part) shape a better future for our world (if only in the minds of its fans).

        On a separate note, due to my work commitments I haven't had the time to watch Jeremiah. I did catch a couple of episodes at the start of the first season and it gripped me (although, in some ways the underlying premise wasn't brand new) because it reminded me of a British drama called The Last Train (broadcast in 1999) about the lives of seven or eight people waking up to a world after an asteroid collision. I'm sure the stories after the first few episodes remained strong, but, I still need a little convincing - should I make the time to sit down and watch this show??

        On another note, seeing as I'm new to this in B5:LotR, did anyone else wonder was Christopher Franke did to the music? I've loved his scores throughout Babylon 5 and even loved the score he did for the 80's series StreetHawk - but was a little lost when in my opinion the "camp" style theme kicked in at the close of B5:LotR - let me know
        Someone reading these words, or watching B5 during its run, will find something here that will become a part of him or her.

        As they grow up, the words of G'Kar, the plight of Londo, the destiny of Delenn and the sacrifice of Sheridan will take root, and the stories they told will filter through, and one day, that person will create their own show, tell their own story, will fight to preserve their passion against overwhelming odds and change the face of science fiction fandom forever.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by Kris79
          On a separate note, due to my work commitments I haven't had the time to watch Jeremiah. I did catch a couple of episodes at the start of the first season and it gripped me (although, in some ways the underlying premise wasn't brand new) because it reminded me of a British drama called The Last Train (broadcast in 1999) about the lives of seven or eight people waking up to a world after an asteroid collision. I'm sure the stories after the first few episodes remained strong, but, I still need a little convincing - should I make the time to sit down and watch this show??
          Yes, indeed. The first season is a little uneven, imo, specifically due to the Sam Egan episodes. For me they were pretty predictable. There's a glimpse of what JMS could do if all of the restrictions and taboos were removed, though, in episodes like "And the Ground, Sown With Salt" or "Firewall" that are really powerful.

          And the second season? JMS wrote 13 of the 15 and it's great. JMS comes up with a *most* unlikely character who's wonderfully played by Sean Astin. There's a nice site http://abyss.hubbe.net/jeremiah/ that's the closest thing I've found to a Lurker's Guide for Jeremiah.

          On another note, seeing as I'm new to this in B5:LotR, did anyone else wonder was Christopher Franke did to the music? I've loved his scores throughout Babylon 5 and even loved the score he did for the 80's series StreetHawk - but was a little lost when in my opinion the "camp" style theme kicked in at the close of B5:LotR - let me know
          Oh, gee, what a shame...I guess I'll have to watch it again to see what you mean. Poor me... <g>

          Jan
          "As empathy spreads, civilization spreads. As empathy contracts, civilization contracts...as we're seeing now.

          Comment

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