Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Interesting JMS Facebook Posts & Tweets

Collapse
This is a sticky topic.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • KoshN
    replied
    Originally posted by Jan View Post
    Once again, JMS has made a thought-provoking post. Please feel free to start a thread in 'Off Topic' if you want to discuss it.



    https://www.facebook.com/#!/permalin...if_t=notify_me

    Jan
    Corporation X would try to buy off, threaten/ruin or kill the civic-minded law enforcement officer, the civic-minded prosecutor, the civic-minded judge and/or all twelve jurors, indirectly, of course.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jan
    replied
    And on a lighter note, from Twitter:

    Originally posted by JMichael Straczynski‏@straczynski
    20h
    Best overheard line at today's Ten Grand signing: "I woke up the next morning covered in Cheese Doodles and shame."

    Leave a comment:


  • Jan
    replied
    Once again, JMS has made a thought-provoking post. Please feel free to start a thread in 'Off Topic' if you want to discuss it.

    Originally posted by Fans of J. Michael Straczynski

    I would like to make a modest suggestion on the subject of congressional corruption – and make no mistake, that’s precisely what it is, and if we’re ever going to deal with it that’s what we need to start calling it – that is affecting both sides of the aisle in the House and Senate.

    When friends and pundits discuss the impact of heavily monied special interest groups on the vote patterns of our elected representatives, who too often reflect the desires of those groups rather than the will of the voters who elected them, the battle cry is always the same: “We have to legislate the money out of the political process.”

    It’s a fine goal. A commendable goal. A noble goal. I find absolutely nothing wrong with it other than it will never happen.

    The handy thing about being a lawmaker is that you get to define and decide what is, in fact, unlawful. If you’re doing something that might incur the wrath of the electorate or, worse still, result in a long visit behind prison walls, you simply rewrite the laws so that whatever you're doing is not illegal.

    We’ve seen this in action before. Prior to the George W. Bush administration, waterboardring had been unequivocally considered torture. In the aftermath of World War Two, Japanese soldiers convicted of having waterboarded American soldiers were executed for having committed torture. For decades every American military manual covering wartime conduct labeled waterboarding torture.

    So when our government decided they wanted to use it on others, they simply redefined waterboarding as “enhanced interrogation” rather than torture and that, as they say, was that. There was nothing different in the practice between now and the 1940s, it was just a matter of adjusting the language and the laws so that what was illegal yesterday is absolutely lawful today.

    Which brings us back around to the parallel subject of congressional corruption.

    If you or I had a real estate or zoning matter pending before a local court, and we slipped the County Clerk a hundred bucks to grease the wheels a bit, he and we would be arrested on charges of bribery...and rightly so. The technical, legal term for this is “exerting undue influence.” That hundred dollars caused the Clerk to spin the wheel of government in our desired direction, so it is only right and proper that we be incarcerated. That’s what the law says.

    But in the halls of the Senate and the House of Representatives, where millions of dollars are routinely funneled into the pockets of our elected officials, they have taken great pains to gut, amend, delete or otherwise revise the laws concerning bribery to the point where they either do not apply or require such a ridiculously high standard that you really have to work to violate it. The corollary would be that you could only be arrested for driving under the influence if you were ALSO going over one hundred miles per hour, AND singing a pre-1975 Rolling Stone cover, AND juggling six (not five, not seven, but six) oranges and one potato (unpeeled, of course), all at precisely the same time.

    So as a rule, the worst penalty one might receive is an ethics violation, which is little more than a procedural slap on the wrist applied by those doing the very same things, and who consequently go easy on the offender because they don’t want to bring too much attention to their own financial dealings. The offense is a breach of protocol and a matter of mild embarrassment rather than a violation of the law.

    Accepting those vast sums is not a crime because, as with waterboarding, they simply defined it otherwise under federal law. Nice work if you can get it.

    Which is why the goal of legislating away monied special interests will never happen. You can’t expect the people receiving the money to vote against their own pocketbook.

    But that is not to say that nothing can be done. Something can be done. It just requires a little civic courage.

    Note the phrase three paragraphs up: “they simply defined it otherwise under federal law.” But the local and state laws concerning bribery remain clear, unmuddied, and very much intact, which is why the aforementioned County Clerk is still locked away in the Iron Bar Hotel.

    You really want to fix congressional corruption on both sides of the aisle? You really want to get the money out of the process? You really want to make your elected officials answerable to those who put them in office? Here’s how you do it.

    It takes just one civic-minded law enforcement officer, one civic minded prosecutor and one civic-minded judge to walk into the local office of a senator or congressman who has received millions of dollars in money from a corporation with business before Congress, business which the elected official voted on in the way the corporation wanted him or her to vote on it...and make an arrest under state or local laws covering bribery and undue influence.

    There’s nothing the federal government can do to prevent such a case being brought, no revision or reconsideration by the House or Senate that can absolve the accused of culpability, no solution to the problem other than a trial by jury.

    And that’s where this whole thing comes to a head.

    More than just about anything else, I want to hear a defense attorney say this to a jury:

    “Yes, my client, the defendant, accepted ten million dollars from Corporation X; yes, my client then voted on bills concerning Corporation X in ways that allowed said corporation to make substantial profits; and yes, Corporation X not only wanted that bill passed, they actually wrote the bill and handed it to my client to bring before Congress and move it forward, which is exactly what happened...but the notion that those ten million dollars had any influence on his actions is simply absurd.”

    I want to see him put that argument before twelve hard-working Americans. I would happily cancel all other entertainment just to be there.

    Given the public’s indignation over the use of money to buy influence, so that the voters have no voice and those with cash cut to the front of the line...given the moral outrage of a nation confronted with the realization that our representatives have failed at the task of being representative...given the County Clerk scenario presented earlier, which would surely be part of any such trial...how do you think the jury would vote?

    Perhaps more to the point: how would you?

    Bills and legislation and discussions with those who make and remake the federal laws in their own vested interest will never, ever get the money out of the process.

    What will start the process of getting the money out is news footage of a Senator or Congressman being perp-walked out of his house in the middle of the night on charges of bribery. One single conviction, on even the smallest of charges, will finish the job.

    It requires just one civic-minded law enforcement officer out of nearly 800,000 across the United States.

    One civic-minded prosecutor.

    And one civic-minded judge.

    And the world will turn irrevocably on its axis.

    J. Michael Straczynski
    https://www.facebook.com/#!/permalin...if_t=notify_me

    Jan

    Leave a comment:


  • Ubik
    replied
    An autobiography... that could make for really interesting reading. I love the tone and content of the B5 Script Book intros, and I could see JMS working really well in autobio mode.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jan
    replied
    A poster on FB commented that he was enjoying the JMS anthology book "Straczynski Unplugged" and asked if there would be more anthologies or prose works.

    Originally posted by Fans of J. Michael Straczynski
    Definitely want to do more prose, haven't had the chance for much fiction work. Main thing taking up my time in prose just now is the autobiography.
    Jan

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X