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  • New JMS Interview

    At InFuze... This online magazine has a new interview with Joe. You have to create a FREE log-in to read the whole thing, but they only send you one e-mail a week, and you can cancel your subscription as soon as you're done. InFuze Magazine

  • #2
    That was good. Thanks, lonerangerone.

    And welcome.

    Jan
    "As empathy spreads, civilization spreads. As empathy contracts, civilization contracts...as we're seeing now.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by lonerangerone
      At InFuze... This online magazine has a new interview with Joe. You have to create a FREE log-in to read the whole thing, but they only send you one e-mail a week, and you can cancel your subscription as soon as you're done. InFuze Magazine
      Interesting how the interview ends.
      Can you tell us anything about the new tv show you've signed on to produce? I'm sure you can't reveal any major details, but will it appeal to Babylon 5 fans? Closer in tone to B5 or Jeremiah?

      It's nothing like either one of them. Suffice to say that I think it will definitely be of interest to B5 fans and fans of science fiction in general.
      Andrew Swallow

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      • #4
        If you don't want to give out your e-mail address at all, go to Bugmenot.com and get a login that someone else has already created...

        Zeno
        No matter where you go, you're only halfway there...

        BB of Elias

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        • #5
          Delurking to post this bit of interesting speculation from sftv.org (www.sftv.org). Scroll down in the weblog to the entry for Sunday, Oct. 30.

          In one of those recent posts, Straczynski indicated he was lined up to be showrunner of a "companion series" that would start filming in Vancouver next spring if it got the go-ahead. About the only thing that really fits that description would be the Masters of SciFi series in development by IDT Entertainment, whose Masters of Horror just debuted on Showtime. Here's an IDT press release on what they have announced so far, including scripts by Harlan Ellison and Ray Bradbury based on their own work and planned stories by Robert A. Heinlein, Stanislaw Lem, and H.G. Wells. Where Harlan goes, Joe probably isn't too far behind....

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          • #6
            Wouldn't that be cool if that's what it turns out to be? JMS knows both writing *and* making a TV show so the adaptations could be as close as possible to what the author envisioned.

            Shiny!

            Jan
            "As empathy spreads, civilization spreads. As empathy contracts, civilization contracts...as we're seeing now.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Jan
              Wouldn't that be cool if that's what it turns out to be? JMS knows both writing *and* making a TV show so the adaptations could be as close as possible to what the author envisioned.

              Shiny!

              Jan
              That would almost make me buy Showtime.
              ---
              Co-host of The Second Time Around podcast
              www.benedictfamily.org/podcast

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              • #8
                It will be interesting to see if this really happens, especially since Showtime has already announced plans for a second season of Masters of Horror. Funnily enough, I was interviewing one of the makeup people recently, and he quite rightly pointed out that on a conceptual level, it would have to be a very different series. Masters of Horror is really a director-driven vehicle. If they did a Masters of Science Fiction, it would have to be a writer-driven series, particularly since there aren't that many so-called 'masters' of SF directors who work in features, who would be willing to take the time out for a TV episode. I'm sure there are two or three, but 13?

                And if Masters of SF is writer-driven, who looks out for the writer's vision on set? Once shooting begins, it's usually the director's ball game (with the exception of something like B5) and the writer's job is usually done. And if you're using stories by classic SF writers like, say, Van Vogt, Herbert, Asimov, etc, you need somebody who is going to be their champion. Harlan Ellison did a sterling job of that on the eighties Twilight Zone revival, but even he couldn't fight the network executives forever. I'm not all that sure that JMS could do it either, so it will be interesting to see what happens.

                And just to provoke a bit more speculation, what classic SF stories would everybody like to see adapted?

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                • #9
                  I would like to see more of Arthur C. Clarke's books made into films, or some of his short stories as episodes in a series. I like his writing because even though some of the stories may be set far in the future, the human characters makes them more relatable to me.

                  I read Childhood's End a long time ago but recently got it again and I still really liked it. I'd like to see that but I don't know how well it would fit into a tv show.
                  Last edited by Spoo Junky; 01-28-2006, 06:01 PM.
                  Flying around the room under my own power.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Joe Nazzaro
                    And just to provoke a bit more speculation, what classic SF stories would everybody like to see adapted?
                    Pretty much anything by Heinlein would work for me. And I don't know if it's a real 'classic', but I'd dearly love to seethe Hugo and Nebula winner "Stardance" by Spider and Jeanne Robinson made. And, hey...they live on an island off of Vancouver so they could consult easily.

                    I was thinking much the same as you posted, Joe, about how Masters of Horror is director-driven but Masters of SF would/should be writer-driven.

                    Jan
                    "As empathy spreads, civilization spreads. As empathy contracts, civilization contracts...as we're seeing now.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Regarding what stories they might chose, Masters of SciFi press-release said that:

                      "MASTERS OF SCI-FI will include stories from the most highly regarded authors in the science fiction genre. Initial masterworks, chosen with an eye towards the one hour format, will include "Dark They Were, And Golden-Eyed" by Ray Bradbury; "'Repent, Harlequin!' Said The Ticktockman" by Harlan Ellison; "The Hunt" by Stanislav Lem, and "The Crystal Egg" by H.G. Wells. Negotiations are currently underway to include "The Last Question" by Isaac Asimov and "Jerry Was A Man" by Robert Heinlein."

                      Looks good. I agree that this look like the series JMS is involved. And even if he is not, this looks interesting.
                      Last edited by Sigma; 01-29-2006, 10:41 AM.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Sigma
                        And even if he is not, this looks interesting.
                        Have any of you watched Masters of Horror? I'm really not a horror fan so I probably wouldn't be able to tell if it's being done right. Any opinions? Joe?

                        Jan
                        "As empathy spreads, civilization spreads. As empathy contracts, civilization contracts...as we're seeing now.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Interesting selection, although some of those adaptations will probably prove more problematic than others. Incidentally, 'The Crystal Egg' was recently adapted as part of a Hallmark mini-series called The Infinite Worlds of H.G. Wells back in 2001 I think. I remember going out and picking up a short story collection by Wells at the time and wondering why more of them hadn't been adapted before.

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                          • #14
                            Oh and Jan, I don't get Showtime, so I haven't been able to see as many episodes as I'd like. I have seen 'Cigarette Burns' by John Carpenter and 'Dreams in the Witch House' by Stuart Gordon, both of which were well done and extremely unsettling. I've also seen Coscarelli's 'Incident On and Off a Mountain Road,' which I believe opened the series and wasn't as satisfying. And I've seen clips from a few others including 'Deer Woman' by John Landis and 'Sick Girl' by Lucky McKee and I think McKee is definitely somebody to watch. I'm not sure if I'll be able to stomach the episode by Japanese director Takashi Miike that was recently dropped by Showtime because of its content; from what I've read about it, that one may be a bit too much for me.

                            I understand Anchor Bay will be releasing each episode individually on DVD soon, in March I think, and much as I'd like to rush out and buy them, I think I'll wait for the inevitable season one boxed set, whenever that comes out.

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                            • #15
                              Ooohh...I just thought of something I'd *love* to see made...The Barsoom books by Edgar Rice Burroughs. I'm not sure it's possible even with today's CGI but I'd still love to see it.

                              Jan
                              "As empathy spreads, civilization spreads. As empathy contracts, civilization contracts...as we're seeing now.

                              Comment

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