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  • Comic Book Movies

    Hi,
    I am doing a college research paper on the artistic liberties filmmakers take with comic book adaptations and the resulting ramifications those deviations can have on the ongoing already-in-print comic title. For example, Bryan SingerÆs ôX-Menö did away with the ostentatiously colored spandex costumes (found in the comics) in favor of slick, black, more-practical, leather apparel and soon after (almost coinciding with the filmÆs release, I believe) Marvel Comics made the decision to alter the X men costumes in the comic world to be of a similarly less gaudy nature. Another example would be the radical departure the comic book, The Mask, took upon the release of the family friendly Jim Carey film adaptation. The once fairly graphic comic concerning a down on his luck sap who enacted his vengeance against the world through acts of abject brutality (usually attended by a flippant sardonic quip), was denatured into an kooky harmless birthday clown more inclined to brandish some variation of rubber balloon animal than say, what normally otherwise wouldÆve been an oozy or an M16. To replicate the movieÆs play-it-safe approach the comic makers took away the characterÆs once-present edge, hoping to siphon fans from the successful & innocuous (albeit profitable) Carey movie over to the comics.
    -What IÆd like to hear from you guys is any other specific citing of cases where the comic film adaption had a direct effect (for better or worse) on the comic series of which you were following. Did recent comic2film adaptions such as Spiderman, The Punisher, Electra, Daredevil, Hulk etc. in any way have any discernible qualitative effect on the already in-progress monthly comic series? For example, did they dumb down the series by divesting itself from any continuing, overlapping plot lines that would possibly be too inaccessible to the influx of newbie fans whoÆve been draw in by the movie? Or did they in any way model themselves after the movie (such as the X-Men costume example)?
    In short, has there ever been a time when the advent of a movie adaption of a fav. comic ended up in someway altering the in-print series?
    Thanks guys,
    Hans Peters
    Last edited by Tornado_Jackson; 01-27-2005, 09:06 AM.

  • #2
    X-Men: I believe the costume change came about a year after the movie, and lasted about three. At the same time, they made the Xavier Institute an actual school again (which the movie did first), and changed Toad's appearance and powers to be closer to the movie. Rogue's powers, too.

    Spider-Man: The biggest example is the recent change to make his webbing come out of him, instead of mechanical web-shooters.

    Daredevil: The only change I can think of is Bullseye's look.

    That's just off the top of my head; I might think of more later. I can easily get more details and particular issue numbers, if you'd like. Good luck with your paper.

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    • #3
      <<Daredevil: The only change I can think of is Bullseye's look.>>

      Not to mention that Kingpin's skin color changed?

      The odd thing about that is that Duncan was perfect as Kingpin. Well, as near to perfect as you can get.
      Recently, there was a reckoning. It occurred on November 4, 2014 across the United States. Voters, recognizing the failures of the current leadership and fearing their unchecked abuses of power, elected another party as the new majority. This is a first step toward preventing more damage and undoing some of the damage already done. Hopefully, this is as much as will be required.

      Comment


      • #4
        He asked what movie changes affected the comics. The Kingpin is still a white man in the comics.

        But I agree -- I think the movie could have been a lot better, but Duncan was a very good fit.

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        • #5
          This may not be directly what you asked (and I never verified it since I don't follow the Superman comics), but I remember hearing that Kent married Lois Lane in the comics only after the Superman TV series (with Dean Cain) had them married.

          Good luck with your paper.
          Such... is the respect paid to science that the most absurd opinions may become current, provided they are expressed in language, the sound of which recalls some well-known scientific phrase
          James Clerk Maxwell (1831-79)

          Comment


          • #6
            <<This may not be directly what you asked (and I never verified it since I don't follow the Superman comics), but I remember hearing that Kent married Lois Lane in the comics only after the Superman TV series (with Dean Cain) had them married.>>

            In the comics, they were probably married and then not married three or four times. Comic book continuity is the worst. I have never been a big fan of Superman, but I kind of feel sorry for him considering what he's been through the last ten years.

            He died. Four ersatz "supermen" took his place. He came back to life. He got a new look as an energy wielder. He was split into two: one red, one blue. He went back to normal.

            As for my favorite, Batman, I feel sorry for the character in a different way. Tim gets murdered. Barbara gets crippled. He gets his back broken. He almost loses Dick as a friend. His city gets hit by a plague. His city gets hit by an earthquake. His city gets disowned by the US government. The Dark Knight Detective never gets a break. No pun intended.
            Recently, there was a reckoning. It occurred on November 4, 2014 across the United States. Voters, recognizing the failures of the current leadership and fearing their unchecked abuses of power, elected another party as the new majority. This is a first step toward preventing more damage and undoing some of the damage already done. Hopefully, this is as much as will be required.

            Comment


            • #7
              Hey Working Class Hero,

              At what point did Spider-man have natural webs instead of the shooters? Peter David addressed that in the Spider-man 2099 series years before the movie was even started, and in fact, I believe I read somewhere that Peter's approach to Spider-man was an influence on the way they worked it into the film.

              In the case of Spider-man, specifically, I don't think I've seen a difference post-movie. Even the more realistic looking costumes were started 11 odd years ago when Alex Ross painted Marvels.

              It makes sense that Xavier Institute would be an actual school. That was also expanded in the books though, to be a worldwide corporation. Something the film never touched on.

              More than just the actual films, Hans, you could probably address the internet itself,... Fan film shorts like Worlds Finest and Batman: Dead End are so good that they have their own following. Thanks to the internet they're also seen by, millions?, of people. I know a friend of mine bought the DVD at a comic show. As the parent company gloms onto the fact that people are experiencing these characters in this way, how are THEY going to adapt to take advantage of this? One way that I've seen on other MB's recently is the lawsuit for copyright infringement concerning likeness, but again, as stated by someone else, why pay to kill free advertising?

              Mike

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              • #8
                Originally posted by jondani
                Hey Working Class Hero,

                At what point did Spider-man have natural webs instead of the shooters?
                It was a recent issue of Spectacular Spider-Man. I couldn't tell you what issue, because I don't read Spectacular. I think it was a leftover from being turned into a giant spider again or something. The change hasn't come up in the other titles, yet, but I believe editor Tom Brevoort said it's going to.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Capt.Montoya
                  This may not be directly what you asked (and I never verified it since I don't follow the Superman comics), but I remember hearing that Kent married Lois Lane in the comics only after the Superman TV series (with Dean Cain) had them married.

                  Good luck with your paper.

                  DC editorial was pushing Clark and Lois towards marriage, but had to speed up their timetable so that it would synch up with the tv show...
                  Got movies? www.filmbuffonline.com

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