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Words, Words, Words

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  • Jan
    replied
    Column # 6 is up now. There's a note that says that, while the column schedule is dependant on JMS's, it'll probably by approximately bi-weekly. Also, in the column JMS invites people to ask questions and suggest topics for him to write columns about in the future.

    Jan

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  • Dr Maturin
    replied
    Here is one of the articles:

    http://www.geocities.com/realsithsquadron/rtc6.html

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  • manwithnoname
    replied
    Originally posted by Z'ha'dumDweller
    Thanks.

    I do have two articles published in a growing magazine (right now, it's probably distriubted all throughout the mid-south and southeast, and maybe a few mid-west and southwestern states), and the people tell me to send them articles any time, so that's always good to have under my belt.
    Z'Dweller, it's great news to hear (read) you've been published twice. What are the names of the two magazine titles? (Hint, hint)

    Did you realize another possibility here? All you have to do is type, in this thread, the names of the magazine titles. And someone might seek out those very same issues, possibly like your stories, write a letter to the editor about how much he/she liked the story, editor requests more stories from same author (that's you, Z'Dweller).

    See?

    I would be interested in reading what you wrote. Rhetorical: How many out there would also like to do the same?

    Take those stories out from your Utility Belt and use them to fight crime...or use it to get noticed at DHorse.

    You've read enough comics to know that having a utility belt is pretty useless -- unless you use what's inside. Cable had all those pouches ([email protected] Liefeld) and he NEVER used them for anything; that's why it took him so long to defeat Apocalypse.

    Batman is a Badmamajamma. Why? He uses the utility belt. Plain and simple. I know I'm being funny here, but there's a lot of truth.

    Jan is correct. Listen to her roar.
    Last edited by manwithnoname; 04-17-2006, 09:00 PM.

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  • Jan
    replied
    From what I understand, having something published that you can put in your cover letter when sending submission is also very helpful.

    Jan

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  • Dr Maturin
    replied
    Thanks.

    I do have two articles published in a growing magazine (right now, it's probably distriubted all throughout the mid-south and southeast, and maybe a few mid-west and southwestern states), and the people tell me to send them articles any time, so that's always good to have under my belt.

    Leave a comment:


  • manwithnoname
    replied
    DHorse New Recruits now accepting entries for the 2006 calendar year.

    Originally posted by Z'ha'dumDweller
    I could never be a comic writer because they'd reject my ideas.

    I sent a few in to DH when they had that open invitation thing a few years ago.
    Taken from DHorse website: "Mike Richardson Wants You to Join the Dark Horse Army. Entries received now through December 31, 2006 will be reviewed in early 2007."


    ZDweller, here's another opportunity for you. They may have rejected you once, but that doesn't mean they'll reject you a second time. Maybe rewriting/polishing your idea/writing sample would do your idea(s) justice.

    here's the weblink: http://www.darkhorse.com/company/newrecruits.php

    good luck!

    Oh, yeah, for those interested: DHorse is having a contest:
    Grand Prize (1):
    - Roundtrip airfare for two.
    - Lodging for three days and two nights (July 21-23).
    - $500 in spending money.
    - 2 passes to the convention (July 21-23).
    - "VIP" pass to all Dark Horse Comics-related events.

    Runners-up (5):
    - Dark Horse Comics Prize Package full of comics, paperbacks, and other items.

    Good luck, everybody!

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  • Dr Maturin
    replied
    I agree with him on writing that story that you just can't find.

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  • Jan
    replied
    JMS has reappeared with his latest Words, Words, Words column. This one is about getting it done.

    Jan

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  • Dr Maturin
    replied
    Originally posted by manwithnoname
    I've read enough novelists' interviews that Hollywood will not let them write the screenplay. Hollywood execs RARELY lets a novelist write their own book's screenplay. It has been done, though.

    Example: Walter Moseley (Devil in a Blue Dress) wrote the book and the screenplay, and he did the same for Always Outnumbered, Always Outgunned. He won an award for one of those screenplays. Granted, Walter is one of the best author I've read. He takes a standard plot and writes so beautifully and lyrical...it's wonderful and intimidating.
    Considering that Flynn isn't a master of form in novels, I wouldn't want him doing screenplays, either. But he would have to be brought in as a producer so that things don't get changed.

    Crichton and Clancy just sign over the stories for money and let Hollywood do what they want, which is fine. While Flynn doesn't want anything outright changed, I doubt he minds if the director takes some creative license. And that's reasonable.

    Originally posted by Jan
    Then I guess if it's something you really want you'll need to set up shop online for a while and after that maybe one of the idies would pick your idea up. Assuming you've got an artist or can draw them yourself?
    Years ago, when a friend and I came up with the idea, we had someone willing to help us out. But that was years ago. I have a few friends who can draw, but time is a factor.

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  • manwithnoname
    replied
    Originally posted by Jan
    Then I guess if it's something you really want you'll need to set up shop online for a while and after that maybe one of the idies would pick your idea up. Assuming you've got an artist or can draw them yourself?

    Jan
    Robert Kirkman (Walking Dead, Invincible, and now writing Ultimate X-Men) found artists for his books by himself. He didn't wait for Marvel/DC or any other indie publisher to sign him up. At Image comics you bring in the product (comic) fully assembled, they just publish it for a flat fee, that's it. Creator-friendly wise, they're a pretty good bet. It's not psuedo-creator-owned property like Marvel/DC.

    In Oregon, there's a lot of professional comic creators living in the area, and other unpublished comic artists looking to illustrate a script.

    You got to put out the feelers, troll the convention halls and build the relationships. It doesn't happen overnight. Hate him or like him, but Bendis was publishing indie books for about 10 years before his success. Think about -- 10 years, dude.

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  • manwithnoname
    replied
    Originally posted by Z'ha'dumDweller
    He isn't the greatest writer form-wise, but his books are entertaining and they would make great movies. But they won't be, at least not for the time being.
    I've read enough novelists' interviews that Hollywood will not let them write the screenplay. Hollywood execs RARELY lets a novelist write their own book's screenplay. It has been done, though.

    Example: Walter Moseley (Devil in a Blue Dress) wrote the book and the screenplay, and he did the same for Always Outnumbered, Always Outgunned. He won an award for one of those screenplays. Granted, Walter is one of the best author I've read. He takes a standard plot and writes so beautifully and lyrical...it's wonderful and intimidating.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jan
    replied
    Originally posted by Z'ha'dumDweller
    Oh, they wouldn't pass. It's a sad state of affairs, but they wouldn't.
    Then I guess if it's something you really want you'll need to set up shop online for a while and after that maybe one of the idies would pick your idea up. Assuming you've got an artist or can draw them yourself?

    Jan

    Leave a comment:


  • manwithnoname
    replied
    Originally posted by Z'ha'dumDweller
    Oh, they wouldn't pass. It's a sad state of affairs, but they wouldn't.
    Don't take this the wrong way, but you're making excuses. What do you think V for Vendetta is about? It has an obvious political bent, but, at the same time, it's a great story.

    I recently saw Hustle and Flow the movie. Have you seen it? It focuses on a black pimp/hustler and populated with a lot of black actors/people -- written/directed by a white guy. In the special features portion of the DVD, the writer/director kept getting turned down by every studio out there, but John Singleton (Boyz 'N the Hood, Four Brothers) believed in the story/movie and kept the script going around Hollywood. Singleton shopped the script to the same studios that already said 'no' the first time. Finally, Singleton believed so strongly in the movie that he decided to spend his own money. Singleton said that the cardinal rule in Hollywood is to never spend your own money in making your own movie.

    I've read over the years about too many movie execs wouldn't know a good movie script if it hit them in the face.

    Also, just b/c some famous writer got turned down and appears on the O'Reilly show, really, doesn't mean anything.

    Comic-wise, Fabian Nicieza (sp?) got started in comics in the production dept (glorified gopher: making coffee, stocking toilet seat sanitary covers and whatnot) or the marketing dept. The point: Fabian started at the bottom and, with persistence, got somebody to give him a chance.

    I forget which, but Matt Hollingsworth or Dave Stewart (both outstanding comic book colorists) started out at DHorse as an intern or butt wiper of some kind.

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  • Dr Maturin
    replied
    Oh, they wouldn't pass. It's a sad state of affairs, but they wouldn't. Here is an example of why...an interview "Blowhard" Bill O'Reilly conducted with Vince Flynn last year:

    O'REILLY: Right. Mitch Rapp does do that. And then you say that, you know, we've got CIA guys who are assassins.

    Now, when you bring the material to Hollywood, because there's no question your books are very entertaining, sell an enormous amount of copies. And they're slam dunk action movies.

    FLYNN: Yes.

    O'REILLY: So you bring your material to Hollywood and what do they...?

    FLYNN: Well, there was a producer in a large studio last year, and we're trying to get a movie made with that studio, so I can't really say anything. But the producer said, she read "Memorial Day" and said, "I hated it. It was more Bush than Bush."

    And I'm standing there thinking, you know, politics have nothing to do with this.

    O'REILLY: Right. You should be making movies because you want to make money and entertain.

    FLYNN: The president in the book was a Democrat. And can't we all get on the same page that terrorists trying to detonate a nuclear warhead in New York City is a bad thing?

    And so I think that their hatred of Bush gets in the way of them making a good business decision. Beyond that, you know, I think they're afraid that it might affect their overseas sales, because it won't play as well abroad. I disagree with that. And then thirdly, I think that they think that they will be targeted for assassination if they make a movie like this.

    O'REILLY: Really. I think it would be they're targeted for disdain by their cocktail buddies.

    FLYNN: Exactly.
    http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,172748,00.html

    Now, Flynn IS an advisor to the show 24. I've never seen the show, so I can't comment on it. He isn't the greatest writer form-wise, but his books are entertaining and they would make great movies. But they won't be, at least not for the time being.

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  • Jan
    replied
    Originally posted by manwithnoname
    I've read many editor interviews saying that it's hard to judge a writer's talent based on an idea or concept.

    Many writers seeking work in Hollywood write a spec screenplay to show their skills.
    I think that almost would have to be the case. Ideas are nice but unless the writer proves that s/he can produce professional quality work, ideas are pretty worthless.

    JMS covers how to send spec stuff to companies in his Complete Book of Scriptwriting and includes handy things like sample release forms.

    Jan

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