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The Score: If not Franke then who?

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  • #16
    Franke would be the de-facto choice.

    That said, I don't see anything wrong with Howard Shore either, other than budget concerns. The man's probably in demand now. Elfman is also good to my ears.

    To counter Willie's geek status and place my own in competition, I suggest Yoko Shimomura. Parasite Eve soundtrack, particularly the main themes. Very cinematic stuff. Nothing against Mitsuda, but sometimes he's too celtic for his own good, and I haven't seen him doing anything standout recently.
    Radhil Trebors
    Persona Under Construction

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    • #17
      Guys,
      I think the choice of composer would probably depend in large part on what type of mood they want to set. Remember when Crusade came out JMS and Franke both agreed that he wouldn't be used because JMS wanted Crusade to be a stand alone with just glimpses of the original B5. So if the movie from what the script seems to indicate will only mention B5 in passing (Lochley's relation to the heroine) and will also use Galen from Crusade, Then maybe Franke will collaborate with another composer. I have both of his B5 compilations and love them both.

      I also own several scores and when I hear of a movie i will often purchase the Score first to see that type of mood they are projecting with the film. Often time for me the score will help me drudge through a movie even if it sucks bigtime.. Case in point: Pirates of the Carribean..
      that is my thoughts..hope it helps
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      • #18
        Vangelis perhaps? He did do Chariots of Fire and much better than that "Bladerunner"

        Or maybe Klaus Schultze is still alive?
        "En wat als tijd de helft van echtheid was, was alles dan dubbelsnel verbaal?"

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        • #19
          Choosing a composer for a score is so difficult. Each has their own little nuances, little trademark sounds. For a B5 movie, I'd probably go with David Newman as my first choice. He's incredibly adept at creating effective, subtle themes that can be slipped in and out of a scene with ease. Take his score for Galaxy Quest, for example. Dozens of themes, all very smooth, comfortable. And when the pace quickens up, he's able to support it perfectly. He is also flexible, in that he will adopt less conventional musical elements and place them in his work.

          Alan Silvestri would be in at a close second. He's pretty well known for his score for Back to the Future, and the rather nice score of Contact. Not much needs to be said here.

          Third, Danny Elfman. Two of my favorite scores, Men In Black (the first, not the second) and Spiderman were composed by this guy, and it's just incredible. However, the large brass sections he typically uses are a bit too strong for B5's generally subtle themes. In addition to this, the tone is generally too low to function in conjunction with Franke's existing score well. However, I would be curious to actually see how one of his scores would pan out in a B5 film. It certainly would be a different feel than we're used to.
          Tyrant Administrator of FirstOnes.com

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          • #20
            Franke is the voice of B5. B5 wouldn't have been the show it was without him. Not only were his scores for the show breathtaking, but his score for "Sleeping in Light" is something that rivals most movies.

            That being said, I think Even Chen should score this movie. He was the voice of Crusade and, at key moments, his music can be very powerful.


            However, I doubt that WB would go for it so, if not Franke, then I'd say James Newton Howard. His stuff is incredible and would fit perfectly with the type of film I think they are going for.

            I wouldn't rule out John Frizzell either. He's scored both of Steve Beck's previous films.
            Last edited by JDSValen; 01-26-2005, 05:03 PM.
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            • #21
              Sanfan wrote:


              "Third, Danny Elfman. Two of my favorite scores, Men In Black (the first, not the second) and Spiderman were composed by this guy, and it's just incredible. However, the large brass sections he typically uses..."

              That's why I like him. I was a trumpet player for many years. I love strong well played brass music. Believe it or not, I did NOT play in the Ohio State marching band! I got my music degree there though. I had enough of marching for a lifeteime in my four years previous to college playing in U.S. Navy bands.

              I sure hope the Galen issue is resolved. If PW isn't available, create a new character for the movie!
              Michael Malloy

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              • #22
                I've just flicked through this thread so apologies if this point has been made before...

                Devil's Advocate Hat On: 'What's the difference between recasting an actor and replacing a composor (or others behind the scenes who have been there from the beginning)?'

                I ask because, to my mind, some of the people we don't see on screen (Franke being one of them) are as important to what B5 is as the actors.

                I'd be interested in other peoples' takes on this...

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by z^3
                  I've just flicked through this thread so apologies if this point has been made before...

                  Devil's Advocate Hat On: 'What's the difference between recasting an actor and replacing a composor (or others behind the scenes who have been there from the beginning)?'

                  I ask because, to my mind, some of the people we don't see on screen (Franke being one of them) are as important to what B5 is as the actors.

                  I'd be interested in other peoples' takes on this...
                  I am in agreement when it comes to someone like a composer, since a score is like another character and voice in any film.

                  Franke will most likely be offered the scoring hat. He has scored many features before and is no stranger it.

                  If not Franke, Brian Tyler, I think has a larger musical voice with some ability to feel very Franke-esque, just listen to his score for Children of Dune...phenominal!

                  But ultimately, I would suspect that Franke will be offered the job. Although, given what's been going on, god only knows.

                  CE
                  Anthony Flessas
                  Writer/Producer/Director,
                  SP Pictures


                  I have no avatar! I walk in mystery and need nothing to represent who and what I am!

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                  • #24
                    Well it wouldn't be B5 without Christoper Franke's music so hopefully he will compse the score for the movie. But if not I would like to see Marty O'Donnell do the score, he did the music for the Halo games. It's pretty unlikely but his music fits sci fi and definately has an epic feel.

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                    • #25
                      The Halo games have wonderful scores.

                      And please no Chen!


                      TWT

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by alex_t
                        I've heard a lot of soundtracks by Howard Shore and they are mostly in the same musical "area" (I don't know any better term). He may be capable of making something completely different, but he already established himself in that "area". And when he's invited to make score for some film, it almost automatically means that film producers want exactly *that* kind of score.

                        That's what I meant, and this is not an offense. I don't think that producers (and other "suites") will take any risk of allowing someone to do something really new.
                        But then does that not sum it all up? Exactly who does produce "really new stuff" these days? Answer...No one. By definition, movie music must fit within rather strict constraints...time and timing being just 2 of them.

                        John Williams, an undisputed master in this regard, a person I take great pleasure in listening to, will still put out pieces that are recognisabley his.

                        Still, at least you can wistle JW's scores (think JAWS, any Star Wars film, Ind Jones, Superman et al), when was the last time you could say that of.....mmm, how about Danny Ellfman? Can anyone here hum/wistle EITHER of the 2 Spiderman themes, or maybe his HULK theme? The last time Ellfman produced a memorable theme was BATMAN. To my mind still his best piece.

                        Many people say that the best kind of movie music is the type you don't even notice, it acts sublinimally without you actually 'hearing' it as such. What total and absolute rubbish. Music from film should indeed enhance what you are seeing, true enough. But as a 'character' in itself (as many here correctly state) it should also have a memorable and gripping voice. As an example, what kind of movies would HALLOWEEN and (again) JAWS have been without that killer scores?
                        Last edited by Firebird; 02-06-2005, 02:49 AM.
                        Not the One......

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                        • #27
                          Still, at least you can wistle JW's scores (think JAWS, any Star Wars film, Ind Jones, Superman et al), when was the last time you could say that of.....mmm, how about Danny Ellfman? Can anyone here hum/wistle EITHER of the 2 Spiderman themes, or maybe his HULK theme? The last time Ellfman produced a memorable theme was BATMAN. To my mind still his best piece.
                          [/B]
                          Batman was superb, but one of the problems with The Hulk (which i think is a far better film than people deserved) was that Ang Lee didn't want a classic 'Elfman' score, so he pushed Elfman to explore other area's, which resulted in one of his best score's yet.

                          As for someone other than Franke, bear in mind that the Director also has input. If Steve Beck could say "Sorry, i understand why you want to go with Franke but i feel we could try something a little more adventurous."

                          No Director wants to work with a dogmatic Producer. "This is your Composer, you have no choice in the matter."
                          Last edited by NivenPournelle; 02-06-2005, 06:51 AM.
                          "We're not here because we're free. We're here because we're not free. There is no escaping reason; no denying purpose. Because as we both know, without purpose, we would not exist. It is Purpose that pulls us. That guides us. That drives us. It is purpose that defines us!"

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                          • #28
                            Franke - anything else would be sacriledge. Utter sacriledge.

                            I wouldn't mind Evan Chen myself, but given a project of this size, it would be one heck of a chance to take (again?). I'd pay money to see the kind of net reaction it would generate though.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by NivenPournelle
                              No Director wants to work with a dogmatic Producer. "This is your Composer, you have no choice in the matter."
                              Yep, that is one of the most worrying things about getting this beastie to fly, frankly. Directors are notorious for not giving a rat's ass about how their inferiors (i.e. all other humans on earth) conceptualize things, as the visions of anyone other than themselves (and a handful of respected peers) is by definition faulty. See: Peter Jackson's vast improvement of JRR Tolkien's lackluster tale.

                              Can you see JMS swallowing this fact of Hollywood? No director wants to work with a dogmatic producer, and there are few producers as dogmatic as JMS re: B5. After all, on this topic, JMS wrote the dogma.
                              I believe that when we leave a place, part of it goes with us and part of us remains. Go anywhere in the station, when it is quiet, and just listen. After a while, you will hear the echoes of all our conversations, every thought and word we've exchanged. Long after we are gone .. our voices will linger in these walls for as long as this place remains. But I will admit .. that the part of me that is going .. will very much miss the part of you that is staying.

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                              • #30
                                In all honesty, Beck (if he's trully slated to direct) is a director for hire only and will most likely not have a great deal of control over such things as composer or other major issues. He's there to do the job of a director and plan the film out visually...that's about it. In most cases like this, the director is not that good or is hired because he's new and needs some time to prove himself.

                                Rarely does this bring about an impactful film, with a few obvious exceptions (Spielberg was a director for hire on JAWS and went that extra couple of hundred miles to prove himself worthy). Beck, on the other hand, is an FX man, who directs because there's more money in it...a vastly different beast...much like Stuart Baird and many Directors of Photography who aren't very good directors, except on some technical level, but who direct to get a bigger paycheck (many of them admit this freely -- which pisses people like me off, who really want to direct because we're directors).

                                In this case, Beck is a hired gun to fulfill a producer's vision, so the main decisions will remain in the hands of JMS and the others most likely. This is why I'm very leary of why they named Beck and why I think it's a bad call on the part of the new producers (who are most likely the ones who hired him). B5 needed a true director who's out to prove something but who could remain true to B5 and its vision while bringing something vast and special to the table...not a "yes" man...which even by Beck's own words in interviews I've read with him, he is. He takes what he's given and does what he's told and never asks for bigger or better. This, to me, is not good.

                                CE
                                Anthony Flessas
                                Writer/Producer/Director,
                                SP Pictures


                                I have no avatar! I walk in mystery and need nothing to represent who and what I am!

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