Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What Kind Of Story is Babylon 5?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Dan Dassow
    replied
    Originally posted by JoeD80 View Post
    There are hints of it here and there in season five with the Drazi situation in Paragon, the way he handles the telepaths, and his attempts to get every race to handle the Centauri situation his way in the lead-up to the big war breaking out in And All My Dreams Torn Asunder.

    This would have been brought more to the forefront I think if Joe had ended up writing the planned 3-part David Sheridan episode.
    Originally posted by Ubik View Post
    This would have been great. Would have really put a bit more meat on the bones of S5.
    Originally posted by Delenn_of_Mir View Post
    Yes, I wish we would have gotten the David arc. That would have been awesome!!!!
    Originally posted by Jonas View Post
    Agreed. It would have added to the show's themes of past/present/future and the rise and fall of civilizations.
    We can hope with the advent of Studio JMS that the David arc will eventually come to fruition. Faith manages.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jonas
    replied
    Agreed. It would have added to the show's themes of past/present/future and the rise and fall of civilizations.

    Leave a comment:


  • Delenn_of_Mir
    replied
    Yes, I wish we would have gotten the David arc. That would have been awesome!!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Ubik
    replied
    Originally posted by JoeD80 View Post
    There are hints of it here and there in season five with the Drazi situation in Paragon, the way he handles the telepaths, and his attempts to get every race to handle the Centauri situation his way in the lead-up to the big war breaking out in And All My Dreams Torn Asunder.

    This would have been brought more to the forefront I think if Joe had ended up writing the planned 3-part David Sheridan episode.
    This would have been great. Would have really put a bit more meat on the bones of S5.

    Leave a comment:


  • JoeD80
    replied
    Originally posted by Delenn_of_Mir View Post
    A season six of Babylon 5 where Sheridan makes the same mistake and turns the Earth Alliance into an Empire would have been the perfect end to that teaching.
    There are hints of it here and there in season five with the Drazi situation in Paragon, the way he handles the telepaths, and his attempts to get every race to handle the Centauri situation his way in the lead-up to the big war breaking out in And All My Dreams Torn Asunder.

    This would have been brought more to the forefront I think if Joe had ended up writing the planned 3-part David Sheridan episode.

    Leave a comment:


  • Delenn_of_Mir
    replied
    Originally posted by babylonlurker View Post
    Joe has declared himself as an atheist. He does have a *very extensive* knowledge of mythology of all sorts.
    In fact, you could see B5 as an amalgam of many mythologies made into a character based epic story.

    You can be a Pantheist and an Atheist at the same time. I am.

    But labels should always be self-identified. So we won't use for any Joe that he doesn't use for himself.

    Other than that one Lost Tales eppy there was never any indication that any gods existed anywhere in the B5verse. Religions aplenty but no dieties ala BSG, which was nice.

    Leave a comment:


  • babylonlurker
    replied
    Originally posted by Delenn_of_Mir View Post
    Is Joe a Pantheist?

    The Minbari were Pantheist's, for sure. They didn't call it that, of course, but from everything I remember Delenn saying about their religion, everything fits except maybe the human-minbari soul transfers.

    A season six of Babylon 5 where Sheridan makes the same mistake and turns the Earth Alliance into an Empire would have been the perfect end to that teaching.

    I sometimes wondered if it was fair that the Narn had to sacrifice so much to save everyone else just because they were Narn? It comes awfully close to home if you compare them to a certain earth group.

    But their anger and thirst for revenge wasn't really helping them, so I guess Kosh did the best he think of.

    I love all the moral debates that B5 draws up and how much it forces us to think.
    Joe has declared himself as an atheist. He does have a *very extensive* knowledge of mythology of all sorts.
    In fact, you could see B5 as an amalgam of many mythologies made into a character based epic story.

    Leave a comment:


  • Delenn_of_Mir
    replied
    Is Joe a Pantheist?

    The Minbari were Pantheist's, for sure. They didn't call it that, of course, but from everything I remember Delenn saying about their religion, everything fits except maybe the human-minbari soul transfers.

    A season six of Babylon 5 where Sheridan makes the same mistake and turns the Earth Alliance into an Empire would have been the perfect end to that teaching.

    I sometimes wondered if it was fair that the Narn had to sacrifice so much to save everyone else just because they were Narn? It comes awfully close to home if you compare them to a certain earth group.

    But their anger and thirst for revenge wasn't really helping them, so I guess Kosh did the best he think of.

    I love all the moral debates that B5 draws up and how much it forces us to think.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jonas
    replied
    Babylon 5 is pretty fundamentally opposed to nationalism and tribalism - Londo and G'Kar's nationalism causes terrible tragedies, the Drazi demonstrate the folly of such thinking in its most distilled form, and so on... until G'Kar ultimately discovers that the most important wisdom is "we are one."

    (This is also what ultimately makes Byron fail - he rejects the militarism of the Psi Corp, but retains the idea that the human species should be divided into telepaths and mundanes. After all, he's fighting for a separate homeland for telepaths, not justice within human society. He means well, but he doesn't get that "we are one.")

    Leave a comment:


  • Marsden
    replied
    That all completely went over my head, but I still loved it when the Drazi, played by Kim Strauss (who was excellent) explains it to Ivanova. He's so serious but yet also has this expectation that it's so damn obvious as well.

    It's great. One of many great moments in a great show.

    Leave a comment:


  • Delenn_of_Mir
    replied
    Huh cool! Thanks for the info.

    That makes sense the in-group/out-group thing. Joe did a great job finding unique ways to discuss that without actually discussing it and making it all part of the universe. He did culture very well.

    *Aaaaand just edited out a silly rant.*
    Last edited by Delenn_of_Mir; 11-24-2014, 02:15 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • DaveNarn
    replied
    "I don’t care to belong to any club that will have me as a member".
    Groucho Marx

    Leave a comment:


  • Dan Dassow
    replied
    Originally posted by phazedout View Post
    this might be something for Jan to wave the mod stick at and hive off to s erparate thread.

    However, myy understandign (and given his extensie reading, possibly JMS's too) is that it si about ingroup/outgtoup psychology. I don't have the refernces to hand but soiologically humans tend to seperate those who are different and identify those who are the same, ging skethy dtails, children were ssigned to a two groups and informed that it had been done on prefrence for a partcular behaviour or thing. They displayed positive actions towards their own group and negative actions towards the other group. When it was eplained that the assignments had been random, the ingroup/outgroup behaviour still manifested.

    I coveerd this in the soial psychology module of my undergraduate degree, I can dig out the specific references if anyone wants me to.
    The Green-Purple Drazi conflict is an expansion of ideas first shown in "Infection". Intolerance to differences is at best foolish and can frequently be fatal. Like the Star Trek episode "Let That Be Your Last Battlefield" that racial intolerance leads to dire consequences. However, the Green-Purple Drazi conflict is an example of intolerance based on imperceptible differences. It perfectly illustrates ingroup/outgroup psychology.

    Leave a comment:


  • phazedout
    replied
    this might be something for Jan to wave the mod stick at and hive off to s erparate thread.

    However, myy understandign (and given his extensie reading, possibly JMS's too) is that it si about ingroup/outgtoup psychology. I don't have the refernces to hand but soiologically humans tend to seperate those who are different and identify those who are the same, ging skethy dtails, children were ssigned to a two groups and informed that it had been done on prefrence for a partcular behaviour or thing. They displayed positive actions towards their own group and negative actions towards the other group. When it was eplained that the assignments had been random, the ingroup/outgroup behaviour still manifested.

    I coveerd this in the soial psychology module of my undergraduate degree, I can dig out the specific references if anyone wants me to.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ubik
    replied
    Originally posted by Delenn_of_Mir View Post
    Was the Green Drazi/Purple Drazi thing a dig at racism? I never caught that, if it was.
    Or just the stupidity of conflict over ideas / differences of perspective?

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X