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What Kind Of Story is Babylon 5?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Dan Dassow View Post
    The first person that comes to mind is
    http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0667326/ Rob Paulsen
    Raphael from the 1987 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Antoine D'Coolette from the 1993 Sonic the Hedgehog, Yakko from Animaniacs, Pinky from Pinky and the Brain, Rude Dog from Rude Dog and the Dweebs, Mighty Max,The Happy Elf, Rev Runner from Loonatics Unleashed, Gordon from Catscratch, Gray Fox in Metal Gear Solid: The Twin Snakes, P.J. Pete in Goof Troop and Carl in The Adventures of Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius

    Other possibilities:
    http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0012121/ Charles Adler
    Buster Bunny on Tiny Toon Adventures, Ed and Bev Bighead on Rocko's Modern Life, I.R. Baboon on I Am Weasel, Cow, Chicken and The Red Guy on Cow and Chicken and I Am Weasel, Starscream in live-action Transformers movies, Doctor Doom in The Super Hero Squad Show, Ickis on Aaahh!!! Real Monsters and Cobra Commander in the current G.I. Joe series. Also serves as voice director for Rugrats, The Wild Thornberrys and As Told by Ginger

    http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0281486/ Charles Fleischer
    Roger Rabbit and others in Who Framed Roger Rabbit

    http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0004931/ June Foray
    Granny (Looney Tunes), Rocky in The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show; also played Natasha

    http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0331906/ Gilbert Gottfried
    Iago in Aladdin, the AFLAC duck, Digit and Widgit in Cyberchase

    http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0363641/ Jess Harnell
    Wakko Warner in Animaniacs, Hunter in Road Rovers, Captain Hero in Drawn Together, Krypto the Superdog, Sewer Urchin and Human Bullet in The Tick, Spyro in Spyro: A Hero's Tail and Spyro: Shadow Legacy, current voice of Crash Bandicoot, Secret Squirrel of the show's same name, Ironhide and Barricade in Michael Bay's Transformers, Wooton in Adventures in Odyssey

    http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0625456/ Jerry Nelson
    Robin the Frog, Floyd, Crazy Harry, Camilla the Chicken, Pops and many characters of The Muppet Show, Count von Count, Mr. Johnson, Herry Monster, Sherlock Hemlock, Little Jerry, Herbert Birdsfoot, Farley, the Amazing Mumford and many characters of Sesame Street, Gobo for Fraggle Rock, and other Muppet series

    http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0758608/ Peter Sallis
    the voice of Wallace in every Wallace and Gromit film, Ratty in The Wind in the Willows TV series and narrator on Rocky Hollow

    http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0761498/ Chris Sanders
    Stitch in Disney's Lilo & Stitch and spinoffs and Kingdom Hearts II

    Wow! So many choices to choose from.

    Comment


    • #17
      What makes B5 so powerful and interesting is that it's not just any one of these things. It's a profoundly political show, in the sense that it's about people within historical context. It's not just about the characters, but about the characters living in that time period, in that part of the universe, and how the events on the grand scale interact with the events within the "tin can" that is Babylon 5.

      And that, frankly, is what I miss in so many modern shows.
      Jonas Kyratzes | Lands of Dream

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      • #18
        Jonas,

        Try "the newsroom" by Aaron Sorkin, it pretty much reflects that reality.
        Phaze
        on the "boxes, my life is in teeny tiny boxes" ID
        "There are no good wars. War is always the worst possible way to resolve differences. It degenerates and corrupts both sides to ever more sordid levels of existence, in their need to gain an advantage over the enemy. Those actively involved in combat are almost always damaged goods for the rest of their lives. If their bodies don't bear scars, their minds do, ofttimes both. Many have said it before, but it can't be said to enough, war is hell. "

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by Jonas View Post
          What makes B5 so powerful and interesting is that it's not just any one of these things. It's a profoundly political show, in the sense that it's about people within historical context. It's not just about the characters, but about the characters living in that time period, in that part of the universe, and how the events on the grand scale interact with the events within the "tin can" that is Babylon 5.

          And that, frankly, is what I miss in so many modern shows.
          Babylon 5 is a profoundly political show. However, it fairly and respectfully represents the perspective of many points in the political spectrum. Likewise, it illuminates the folly of using litmus tests to determine whether someone is a pure disciple of a political ideology.

          Babylon 5 is a profoundly spiritual show. It is respectful of the many Earth and extra-terrestrial religions. It is not above poking good natured fun at a pan-theist, bacchanal based religion.

          Babylon 5 is profoundly multicultural. It embraces different culture, Minbari, Centari, Narn, Human and many others, without favoring one over another. It demonstrates that intolerance of other cultures is at best foolish as illustrated by conflict between the Green Drazi and Purple Drazi.

          Babylon 5 is profoundly respectful of the differences between the genders and sexual orientation.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Dan Dassow View Post
            Babylon 5 is a profoundly political show. However, it fairly and respectfully represents the perspective of many points in the political spectrum. Likewise, it illuminates the folly of using litmus tests to determine whether someone is a pure disciple of a political ideology.

            Babylon 5 is a profoundly spiritual show. It is respectful of the many Earth and extra-terrestrial religions. It is not above poking good natured fun at a pan-theist, bacchanal based religion.

            Babylon 5 is profoundly multicultural. It embraces different culture, Minbari, Centari, Narn, Human and many others, without favoring one over another. It demonstrates that intolerance of other cultures is at best foolish as illustrated by conflict between the Green Drazi and Purple Drazi.

            Babylon 5 is profoundly respectful of the differences between the genders and sexual orientation.
            As G'Kar writes :

            "The Universe speaks in many languages, but only one Voice ....."
            Jan from Denmark

            My blog :

            http://www.babylonlurker.dk

            "Our thoughts form the Universe - they *always* matter"

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Jonas View Post
              What makes B5 so powerful and interesting is that it's not just any one of these things. It's a profoundly political show, in the sense that it's about people within historical context. It's not just about the characters, but about the characters living in that time period, in that part of the universe, and how the events on the grand scale interact with the events within the "tin can" that is Babylon 5.

              And that, frankly, is what I miss in so many modern shows.
              Bang on assessment there.
              Captain John Sheridan: I really *hate* it when you do that.

              Kosh: Good!

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              • #22
                Was the Green Drazi/Purple Drazi thing a dig at racism? I never caught that, if it was.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Delenn_of_Mir View Post
                  Was the Green Drazi/Purple Drazi thing a dig at racism? I never caught that, if it was.
                  Or just the stupidity of conflict over ideas / differences of perspective?
                  Captain John Sheridan: I really *hate* it when you do that.

                  Kosh: Good!

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                  • #24
                    this might be something for Jan to wave the mod stick at and hive off to s erparate thread.

                    However, myy understandign (and given his extensie reading, possibly JMS's too) is that it si about ingroup/outgtoup psychology. I don't have the refernces to hand but soiologically humans tend to seperate those who are different and identify those who are the same, ging skethy dtails, children were ssigned to a two groups and informed that it had been done on prefrence for a partcular behaviour or thing. They displayed positive actions towards their own group and negative actions towards the other group. When it was eplained that the assignments had been random, the ingroup/outgroup behaviour still manifested.

                    I coveerd this in the soial psychology module of my undergraduate degree, I can dig out the specific references if anyone wants me to.
                    "There are no good wars. War is always the worst possible way to resolve differences. It degenerates and corrupts both sides to ever more sordid levels of existence, in their need to gain an advantage over the enemy. Those actively involved in combat are almost always damaged goods for the rest of their lives. If their bodies don't bear scars, their minds do, ofttimes both. Many have said it before, but it can't be said to enough, war is hell. "

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by phazedout View Post
                      this might be something for Jan to wave the mod stick at and hive off to s erparate thread.

                      However, myy understandign (and given his extensie reading, possibly JMS's too) is that it si about ingroup/outgtoup psychology. I don't have the refernces to hand but soiologically humans tend to seperate those who are different and identify those who are the same, ging skethy dtails, children were ssigned to a two groups and informed that it had been done on prefrence for a partcular behaviour or thing. They displayed positive actions towards their own group and negative actions towards the other group. When it was eplained that the assignments had been random, the ingroup/outgroup behaviour still manifested.

                      I coveerd this in the soial psychology module of my undergraduate degree, I can dig out the specific references if anyone wants me to.
                      The Green-Purple Drazi conflict is an expansion of ideas first shown in "Infection". Intolerance to differences is at best foolish and can frequently be fatal. Like the Star Trek episode "Let That Be Your Last Battlefield" that racial intolerance leads to dire consequences. However, the Green-Purple Drazi conflict is an example of intolerance based on imperceptible differences. It perfectly illustrates ingroup/outgroup psychology.

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                      • #26
                        "I don’t care to belong to any club that will have me as a member".
                        Groucho Marx

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                        • #27
                          Huh cool! Thanks for the info.

                          That makes sense the in-group/out-group thing. Joe did a great job finding unique ways to discuss that without actually discussing it and making it all part of the universe. He did culture very well.

                          *Aaaaand just edited out a silly rant.*
                          Last edited by Delenn_of_Mir; 11-24-2014, 02:15 AM.

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                          • #28
                            That all completely went over my head, but I still loved it when the Drazi, played by Kim Strauss (who was excellent) explains it to Ivanova. He's so serious but yet also has this expectation that it's so damn obvious as well.

                            It's great. One of many great moments in a great show.
                            "And what kind of head of Security would I be if I let people like me know things that I'm not supposed to know? I mean, I know what I know because I have to know it. And if I don't have to know it, I don't tell me, and I don't let anyone else tell me either. " And I can give you reasonable assurances that the head of Security will not report you for doing so."
                            "Because you won't tell yourself about it?"

                            "I try never to get involved in my own life, too much trouble."

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                            • #29
                              Babylon 5 is pretty fundamentally opposed to nationalism and tribalism - Londo and G'Kar's nationalism causes terrible tragedies, the Drazi demonstrate the folly of such thinking in its most distilled form, and so on... until G'Kar ultimately discovers that the most important wisdom is "we are one."

                              (This is also what ultimately makes Byron fail - he rejects the militarism of the Psi Corp, but retains the idea that the human species should be divided into telepaths and mundanes. After all, he's fighting for a separate homeland for telepaths, not justice within human society. He means well, but he doesn't get that "we are one.")
                              Jonas Kyratzes | Lands of Dream

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                              • #30
                                Is Joe a Pantheist?

                                The Minbari were Pantheist's, for sure. They didn't call it that, of course, but from everything I remember Delenn saying about their religion, everything fits except maybe the human-minbari soul transfers.

                                A season six of Babylon 5 where Sheridan makes the same mistake and turns the Earth Alliance into an Empire would have been the perfect end to that teaching.

                                I sometimes wondered if it was fair that the Narn had to sacrifice so much to save everyone else just because they were Narn? It comes awfully close to home if you compare them to a certain earth group.

                                But their anger and thirst for revenge wasn't really helping them, so I guess Kosh did the best he think of.

                                I love all the moral debates that B5 draws up and how much it forces us to think.

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