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  • Lyta was deaf?

    I'm reading "Clark's Law" and according to the author Lyta Alexander was deaf.

    Where in the galaxy did that come from?

    I know that the actor who played Stephen was deaf in real life, something I was absolutely shocked to hear, so I guess it's possible that Lyta could have been deaf too and it was just never mentioned anywhere else.

    Unless I've missed something?

    Were the dell writers allowed to just make up whatever they wanted about canon characters?

  • #2
    {I read somewhere that Lyta is deaf.}

    No, the novelist didn't blow it, Joe blew it, because in proofreading the
    manuscript, Joe missed that line somehow, and didn't catch it. It's my job
    to catch these things. (Just spent a whole week going over the A-Z of
    Babylon 5 coming out from Boxtree Books in the UK to keep it as accurate as
    possible.)

    jms
    http://jmsnews.com/msg.aspx?id=1-14070

    That's the perfect example of why those books are considered only canon 'in he broad strokes'.

    Jan
    "As empathy spreads, civilization spreads. As empathy contracts, civilization contracts...as we're seeing now.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Jan View Post
      http://jmsnews.com/msg.aspx?id=1-14070

      That's the perfect example of why those books are considered only canon 'in he broad strokes'.

      Jan

      Wow that's a really big typo.

      I'm still wondering where the author came up with it though. Did he just think it was cool so added it and figured if JMS didn't approve it would be cut out? Talk about taking liberties. Geesh.

      Though from Joe's tone it sounds like he didn't mind the authors making up stuff like that. That's nice of him, actually.

      Thanks so much, Jan!!!!

      Comment


      • #4
        It's kind of a fine line. You expect writers to flesh out characters and the universe or the script (as in the movie adaptations) but I don't think they're supposed to change anything about the fundamental make-up of the character.

        It's been *many* years since I read it. Did her supposed deafness have anything to do with the story or was it just mentioned in passing?

        Jan
        "As empathy spreads, civilization spreads. As empathy contracts, civilization contracts...as we're seeing now.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Jan View Post
          It's kind of a fine line. You expect writers to flesh out characters and the universe or the script (as in the movie adaptations) but I don't think they're supposed to change anything about the fundamental make-up of the character.

          It's been *many* years since I read it. Did her supposed deafness have anything to do with the story or was it just mentioned in passing?

          Jan

          I stopped reading at that part, so I don't know if it becomes part of the story or not. Lyta was hiding in down below from the psi corp and it was mentioned that she couldn't hear all of the noise.

          That's interesting about having to flesh out other people's characters and stories. I didn't have any idea how the process worked.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Delenn_of_Mir View Post
            That's interesting about having to flesh out other people's characters and stories. I didn't have any idea how the process worked.
            Well, I'm no writer so I don't know a lot about the process but it seems to be normal when the writers did novelizations of the TV movies. This post by JMS about why the 'River of Souls' novel didn't happen touches on this aspect.

            http://jmsnews.com/msg.aspx?id=1-6043

            Jan
            "As empathy spreads, civilization spreads. As empathy contracts, civilization contracts...as we're seeing now.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Jan View Post
              Well, I'm no writer so I don't know a lot about the process but it seems to be normal when the writers did novelizations of the TV movies. This post by JMS about why the 'River of Souls' novel didn't happen touches on this aspect.

              http://jmsnews.com/msg.aspx?id=1-6043

              Jan

              Oooh I love Fiona Avery, I bet her B plot would have been fantastic. It's sad that book didn't work out. It sounds like novelizations are a lot like fan fiction, so probably hiring a really good fan fic writer like Gareth would be a good idea. Someone who can nail the characters and who is brimming over with their own backstory ideas, etc.

              I used to do V RPG, but I've never really tackled B5 because I love it so much I'd be afraid of wrecking it.

              Thanks for link, Jan! I need to spend some more time in those archives, methinks.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Jan View Post
                http://jmsnews.com/msg.aspx?id=1-14070

                That's the perfect example of why those books are considered only canon 'in he broad strokes'.

                Jan
                That's why I consider Dell 1 thru 6 & 8, as well as parts of the novelization of A Call to Arms, as bad, but officially commissioned, fan fiction. I've read them all, and still have them all, but have no desire to read them again.
                Mac Breck (KoshN)
                ------------------
                Warner Brothers is Lucy.
                JMS and we fans are collectively Charlie Brown.
                Babylon 5 is the football.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by KoshN View Post
                  That's why I consider Dell 1 thru 6 & 8, as well as parts of the novelization of A Call to Arms, as bad, but officially commissioned, fan fiction. I've read them all, and still have them all, but have no desire to read them again.
                  That is how I look at it. They seem like alternate universe stuff to me. I remember how greatly disappointed I was when I read them. I've never considered them part of the real arc because so many things seemed so far off of what we saw and learned in the show. I am actually glad I don't remember specific examples.
                  Susan Ivanova, "I'll be in the car."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    And I never bought those books, based on KoshN's and others' advice, because I didn't want fan fiction based on B5.

                    Fan fiction can be ok, especially when some of the fans know the material more than the paid writers do, but that is absolutely not the case with B5. I'd site examples, but why bother, I'm sure you all thought of the same franchises and other things that I'm thinking.
                    "And what kind of head of Security would I be if I let people like me know things that I'm not supposed to know? I mean, I know what I know because I have to know it. And if I don't have to know it, I don't tell me, and I don't let anyone else tell me either. " And I can give you reasonable assurances that the head of Security will not report you for doing so."
                    "Because you won't tell yourself about it?"

                    "I try never to get involved in my own life, too much trouble."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Part of the problem with the early books, surely, is that they were written when the show had hardly been on air, so there was very little for the writers to work with. That doesn't excuse the endless poor writing apparent in most of them, but it does give us an insight into why the authors didn't have a handle on the characters.
                      The Optimist: The glass is half full
                      The Pessimist: The glass is half empty
                      The Engineer: The glass is twice as big as it needs to be

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