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Secrets of the Soul.

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  • Secrets of the Soul.

    I was watching this episode (5x07) yesterday, in the evening, and it got me woundering.
    This Hyachs and there secret about wiping out the Hyach-Doh race.
    Do you think there is a resemblence, between Hyach and Hyach-Doh like Women and Men on our planet?
    "We are the universe, trying to understand itself."

  • #2
    .......Huh?
    Radhil Trebors
    Persona Under Construction

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    • #3
      Actually I've always thought it resembled the idea of two genetically related, but different species living on the same planet, like the Homo sapiens and the Neanderthal. It never came to my mind that this could be a gender-issue...?!

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      • #4
        You mean in the 'can't live with 'em, can't live without 'em' sense??

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        • #5
          To be honest, this is one of those things that never quite made sense to me. I'm not a geneticist (or a biologist of any kind), but I could never figure out how a related species (subspecies?) could have something that the other required in such a way that they would die out over the span of several centuries.

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          • #6
            I had genetics at the university and for what I know did the story make sense... but I'm too lazy for further explanations (it's late and scientific English isn't too easy for a non native speaker ^^)

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            • #7
              Originally posted by SLerman View Post
              To be honest, this is one of those things that never quite made sense to me. I'm not a geneticist (or a biologist of any kind), but I could never figure out how a related species (subspecies?) could have something that the other required in such a way that they would die out over the span of several centuries.
              I think the timeframe was collapsed for story purposes, but the idea that foreign genetic substances are needed for species survival in the long term is a biological fact (if rare). I am thinking the species of wasp that needs a beetle host, or something like that. The news was new when the story would have been written, and JMS is drawn to that sort of thing.
              I believe that when we leave a place, part of it goes with us and part of us remains. Go anywhere in the station, when it is quiet, and just listen. After a while, you will hear the echoes of all our conversations, every thought and word we've exchanged. Long after we are gone .. our voices will linger in these walls for as long as this place remains. But I will admit .. that the part of me that is going .. will very much miss the part of you that is staying.

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              • #8
                It could me related to group-immunity. I wrote a paper on this back in medschool. The principle is that you have a large population what has been vaccinated against microbe/prion X. Within that population is a smaller number of people that do not get the vaccination. When these non-vaccinated people are living among the larger population they do not get sick, but remove the population from around them and bang they get sick. The reason why they didn't get sick earlier is because the pathogens didn't have host from which to move to the non-vaccinated.

                But, if I recall correctly the Hyach didn't sick? There was some genetic degradation or what not. In this case it could have been that Hyach-Doh carried the active gene need for protein synthesis of telomerases (proteins that cap cap the end of chromosomes). As long as the Hyach-Doh were alive and giving this dominant gene onwards, the Hyach were fine, but when they got rid of them the gene started to disappear slowly and thus we their chromosomes would start slowly to loose structural cohesion.

                Just two wild guesses. Maybe the Hyach don't even have chromosomes

                -Dip

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                • #9
                  But if it was genetic, couldn't the part of the Hyach population that did have the gene from the Hyach-Doh pass it on to other Hyachs? Should I just give up trying to understand this since I don't know nearly enough about genetics, or should we just take the easy way out and assume that Hyach genetics is wildly different than human genetics?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by SLerman View Post
                    But if it was genetic, couldn't the part of the Hyach population that did have the gene from the Hyach-Doh pass it on to other Hyachs?
                    It depends... is the gene recessive or dominant and how big is the population with the Hyach-Doh gene? (I guess they were too few)

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                    • #11
                      The idea is that the gene is dominant in the Hyach-Doh, but is always recessive in the Hyachs or it starts to lose dominancy after the original doner (hyach-doh) no longer resupply the pool.

                      -Dip

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                      • #12
                        Greetings All!
                        I'm Slerman's girlfriend. A converted Star Trek fan
                        I am a third year bio major and I took genetics last semester so he asked me what I thought about this question. I e-mailed my genetics professor and this was the response that I got. . .
                        What an interesting question you ask!
                        I love science fiction myself, but I find much it based on misunderstanding of science.
                        There are several examples of all-female species that reproduce by parthenogenesis, but whose eggs require activation by sperm. These females mate with males of closely related, sexually reproducing species, thereby getting the sperm they need. The sperm do not contribute nuclei to the zygote.
                        There are also many cases of "self-incompatibility". Plants, which would otherwise be capable of self-fertilization, are blocked from doing so at the stage of gamete interaction. Only crosses between different genotypes are fertile.
                        However, I know of no example of sexually reproducing forms that require outcrossing to another subspecies or species.
                        I'll do a little research on the question, and see if I can find such an example.

                        Cheers!

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