Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

B5:The Legend of The Rangers

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • JohnFourtyTwo
    replied
    I got the last copy of The Legend of the Rangers from the Navy Exchange in Norfolk, Virginia a few days ago and I wasn't disappointed. I was very happy to see G'Kar again as he symbolicly passed the torch to the new guys, unfortunately they didn't make a series out of it.

    Hopefully the new direct-to-DVDs will be just as good or better. Can't wait!

    Leave a comment:


  • Joseph DeMartino
    replied
    I sit corrected. I know I'd run across the term in other contexts, both film and print, and misremembered it as being used more widely than it was. Apparently the were all British sources. What can I say? I've always had a soft spot for the Royal Navy.

    Regards,

    Joe

    Leave a comment:


  • grumbler
    replied
    Originally posted by Joseph DeMartino
    1) "Number One" is just a conventional nickname for the executive officer (2nd in command) in a military organization, not some kind of unique character name. (The same way all New York City Police Lieutenants are addressed as "Lou".) It has been especially popular in the British and American navies, somewhat less so in the ground forces.
    To pick a nit on a fun historical topic, Star Trek got this wrong. "Number One" is the ship's First Lieutenant, usually not the Executive Officer (who would be referred to in the RN as "the Commander" in the third person and "Commander" to his face." The First Lieutenant was the senior lieutenant onboard and in charge of the deck crew and exterior of the ship. In the RN he was referred to as "Jimmy" (or "Jimmy the One") in the third person and "Number One" to his face. In smaller ships (which didn't have any officers but the CO ranked higher than Lieutenant) the First Lieutenant would also be the XO, and in that case called "Number One" because he didn't qualify to be called "Commander." A Commander would never be called "Number One" unless he was the First Lieutenant (as an assignment, as in on a carrier or battleship) and not the Executive Officer as he would qualify for the term "the Commander" which carried much more prestige.

    "Number One" is strictly an RN (and derivative navy) nickname. The USN does not use it, nor do any ground forces of which I am aware.

    Leave a comment:


  • I love Lyta
    replied
    I came across a remark that ST was "Horatio Hornblower in outer space".
    I loved that movie. "Hrmhemhem..."

    Leave a comment:


  • B5_Obsessed
    replied
    NotKosh,

    Yeah, it has been mentioned.

    There is also:

    www.starshipexeter.com
    So-so first episode, really good second episode (not yet finished)


    www.starshipfarragut.com
    In startup mode. First episode expected early to mid-2007.


    www.startrekofgodsandmen.com
    Celebrity-filled fan fest coming in three installments during 2007.

    Leave a comment:


  • Joseph DeMartino
    replied
    Originally posted by Jan
    Majel couldn't give permission as she doesn't own Trek. I'd heard from various sources that Paramount did give permission on the condition that no money ever be made from them. Word is that Walter Koenig and George Takai and possibly some others have lent their talents to the episodes.

    Jan
    Paramount has always been a little more tolerant of non-commercial fan use of the Trek universe, because they're aware that the fans were an important element in turning a dead show into a franchise and because they made more money off the hordes of fans buying merchandise, books, calendars and car air-fresheners than they did off the episodes themselves. (A major reason for the constant uniform redesigns on the various series was the need to get a new line of action figures to market.)

    Hell, back in the late 70s Paramount itself arranged to get a volume of fan fiction published, and a couple of writers represented in that book were good enough that they were later able to sell their own manuscripts to major SF and Fantasy publishers.

    Of course, when your show is a world-wide phenonmenon, and your fans will buy a dead cat as long as you slap a Federation "swoosh" on it, you can afford to be more tolerant.

    Regards,

    Joe
    Last edited by Joseph DeMartino; 12-29-2006, 06:41 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jan
    replied
    Originally posted by NotKosh
    I guess they secured permission from Majel Roddenberry.
    Majel couldn't give permission as she doesn't own Trek. I'd heard from various sources that Paramount did give permission on the condition that no money ever be made from them. Word is that Walter Koenig and George Takai and possibly some others have lent their talents to the episodes.

    Jan

    Leave a comment:


  • NotKosh
    replied
    FYI. This has probably been mentioned, but maybe not everyone knows.

    A group of people are making ST:TOS episodes on their own. I guess they secured permission from Majel Roddenberry. Anyways, these eps are coming out about 2 per year, they are free to download. The graphics, of course, are better

    http://www.newvoyages.com/

    In Harm's Way was a great episode.
    The latest one To Serve All My Days has Walter Koenig in it (aging episode).
    Last edited by NotKosh; 12-29-2006, 09:59 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • B5_Obsessed
    replied
    This installment of TLT takes place 10 years after the formation of the IA, so Galen may make some oblique reference to the very recently concluded mission of the Excalibur and crew just to pique our interest. Doubt we'll get anything really juicy for a while though.

    God, I want this to be good.

    Leave a comment:


  • KoshN
    replied
    Originally posted by Joseph DeMartino
    You're misremembering. JMS never said that because ownership was never the issue with Crusade, which was an established property, and was an issue with Rangers, which was a brand-new series idea being developed expressly for Sci-Fi.
    No, I remember asking JMS why The Sci-Fi Channel didn't continue Crusade, and why he didn't pitch that idea to The Sci-Fi Channel, and JMS said he did pitch that idea to them and they declined because Warner Brothers wouldn't let them (Sci-Fi) own a piece of Crusade. So, they went with something that Sci-Fi could own, the Rangers pilot.

    I'll find the JMS post, sooner or later.




    Originally posted by Joseph DeMartino
    Here is something that JMS actually did say on the subject:

    JMS made it clear in a subsequent post that Sci-Fi wanted to wait until they saw how Crusade did "on their air". After they had run the show once, put the decision on hold and continued forward with the Rangers pilot, I pointed out the obvious fact that JMS had arranged the time period of the proposed Rangers series in such a way that it would reach 2267 (the first season of Crusade) in its 3rd season - and if the ratings were good enough for Rangers to make it to S3 then they might be good enough to make Sci-Fi go for Crusade as a "spin-off" from the newer show.

    Later still JMS gave an interview to Cinescape where he suggested that some parts of the Crusade story line could be resolved in the Rangers series, if necessary. This is from one of our exchanges on the topic on the moderated newsgroup, 16 August 2001:
    Yes, I already found those posts. The one I'm talking about above was around the time it first became known that Rangers idea had been picked by Sci-Fi (~March 2001?). It was quite a few months prior to the JMS post:

    http://www.jmsnews.com/msg.aspx?id=1-16397

    From: [email protected] (Jms at B5)
    Subject: Re: Attn JMS: Rangers, Crusade, DVDs
    To: rec.arts.sf.tv.babylon5.moderated
    Date: 8/16/2001 5:55:00 PM
    View Thread
    (2 messages)


    >Your most recent comments quoted on "Cinescape On-Line" have produced the
    >latest round of "See, I *told* you 'Crusade' is definitely dead" posts.
    >Based on your earlier comments, I didn't read it that way. It just sounds
    >to me like you have a plan "B" in mind in case Sci-Fi decides it absolutely
    >*isn't* interested in "Crusade" after "Rangers" has been on the air for
    >awhile. Otherwise your preference would still be to finish the "Crusade"
    >story on a show called "Crusade." Am I wrong?

    Sigh...I guess these are people who, on finding one door locked, never think to
    go in a window and just leave. You *always* have a plan B. Also a plan C, D
    and E.


    jms

    ([email protected])
    (all message content (c) 2001 by synthetic worlds, ltd.,
    permission to reprint specifically denied to SFX Magazine
    and don't send me story ideas)

    Leave a comment:


  • B5_Obsessed
    replied
    Actually, just saw the Menagerie remastered recently, and Pike assembles every man on the bridge and invites them to beam down, even stopping to ask one of his officers who was recently injured on Rigel if "he feels up to it". As he heads for the turbolift he gives Number 1, now moping at the helm station like a jilted June bride, the patronizing comment, "Sorry, Number One, I can't risk losing my best officer." She replies, "Understood", while staring disappointedly off into space.

    It was only after Pike was captured and she was in charge that she got her coat and went down to the planet, first to supervise the laser barrage of the Talosians' front door, and then with the intent of beaming directly into the underground complex (which led to her capture as well).

    Truth be told, at the start of TNG, Picard sat on the bridge and got away team progress reports from Riker, but this breach of tv-reality annoyed viewers who thought Picard was a big sissy. Eventually he started insisting, over Riker's protests, that he go until it became standard procedure.
    Last edited by B5_Obsessed; 12-28-2006, 11:48 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Joseph DeMartino
    replied
    Aside from a few character gems, STTNG was "Who will Picard surrender to this week" up until the end of the 3rd season.
    Well after all, despite the accent he was French...

    Regards,

    Joe

    Leave a comment:


  • Joseph DeMartino
    replied
    Hold up. The character #1 was originated long before, played by his to-be-wife Majel Barret in the 1st ST pilot "The Cage". The 1st time around, Pike was on the ship, while #1 went down.
    1) "Number One" is just a conventional nickname for the executive officer (2nd in command) in a military organization, not some kind of unique character name. (The same way all New York City Police Lieutenants are addressed as "Lou".) It has been especially popular in the British and American navies, somewhat less so in the ground forces. Gene thought that it would add to the original X.O's mystique if her name was rarely used, but the fact that Picard later used the same nickname for Riker hardly makes them the same character. It is like saying that Ernie "Coach" Pantusso from Cheers is the same character as "Coach" Hayden Fox from Coach.

    2) In "The Cage" it was not established that Number One leading the landing party was standard operating procedure. In fact, most of the flashbacks show Pike at the point of maximum danger - and of course he joined the landing party as soon as humanly possible. (Haven't watched "The Cage" or "The Menagerie" for a long time, so I'm hazy on the details. But I'm pretty sure Pike was going to beam down with the first group but was talked out of it, possibly on the grounds that he was still recovering from injuries sustained in their previous adventure.)

    I don't think the events of "The Cage" prefigure Gerrold's idea of what an Away Team would be. (He would have put an ensign in charge.) Riker's position came from the thought that they needed one of the series leads on the Away Team, because they were still thinking in much more conventional terms - Lead, 2nd Lead, 1st Supporting actor - rather than an ensemle. so it was more a modification of Gerrold's idea ("yeah, we'll do it, but with the exec") than a return to "The Cage".

    Regards,

    Joe

    Leave a comment:


  • NotKosh
    replied
    Originally posted by Joseph DeMartino



    BTW, all of the Trek series carried a "based upon" credit for Gene Rodennberry that ensured some payments to his estate. And the notion that he "created" TNG is something of a crock in and of itself. The "created by" credit for that series really should have gone to David Gerrold, who came up with the idea of the "away team" led by a junior (and preferably expendable) officer back in the TOS days and who wrote the TNG series bible and did all the heavy lifting involved in getting the show off the ground - only to be pushed out by Gene once things were going OK. Gene's major contributions to that show consisted of watering down Gerrold's more interestng ideas, introducing yet another "whatzit who wants to be human" character and inflicting Wesley Crusher on us. Not exactly his finest hour.
    Hold up. The character #1 was originated long before, played by his to-be-wife Majel Barret in the 1st ST pilot "The Cage". The 1st time around, Pike was on the ship, while #1 went down.

    TV reality got in the way with having your most expensive actor sitting in orbit while the action happened planetside, where the captain couldn't be risked. Edit (OK, you basically stated that later).

    It has been a long time since i have read Roddenberry & Whitfield's Making of Star Trek, or David Gerrold's book either. They are both falling apart by now.
    Reading those, I came across a remark that ST was "Horatio Hornblower in outer space". That made me look up Hornblower. For that also, I will be indebted.

    I was happy to see one of the original ST concept models for the Enterprise show up on the last TOS episode as Crusher's science vessel. Although it looked really goofy given the evolution of StarFleet vessel design.

    Aside from a few character gems, STTNG was "Who will Picard surrender to this week" up until the end of the 3rd season.

    "Let history not forget the name... Enterprise"
    Last edited by NotKosh; 12-27-2006, 01:39 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Joseph DeMartino
    replied
    Originally posted by frulad
    Hey Joe, I seem to recall excerts of Gerrold's Bible appearing in (I think) Starlog back in the day in the runup to Next Gen's premier. Was the whole thing ever published anywhere?
    Given that they marketed almost everything connected with TNG, I wouldn't be surprised if the first season bible were published somewhere, but I'm not sure because I really didn't follow the show, especially in the early years. ("Encounter at Farpoint" did not impress me and I only caught episodes intermittently until the third season or so. "Yesterday's Enterprise" was the first episode that really made me sit up and take notice.)

    Gerrold discussed his original conception of the Away Team in his book The World of Star Trek, if memory serves. He thought it should have been under the command of a young "Kirk-in-training" type like Ensign Chekhov - someone with enough training and experience to lead the team but junior enough that nobody would lose too much sleep if he got himself killed. (In contrast to having the Captain or the First Officer - or worse still both - constantly beaming into dangerous unknown situations week after week.) The team would have had a core group of first contact and combat types who made virtually all initial landing surveys, supplemented by additional specialists in the sciences, language or diplomacy depending on the particular mission. For realism's sake Gerrold wanted a least a few team members killed off every year - and not just among the one-time guest stars and red shirts. Space exploration is supposed to be a dagnerous business and there should be casualties.

    All-in-all a much more realistic and sensible approach to the Away Team than what we got on the series, but still better than TOS's habit of sending Kirk, Spock and McCoy beaming into jeopardy every week. (Although in fairness if you've sold Trek as an action adventure series and you're paying William Shatner and Leonard Nimoy to star in it, you have to send them into the fray. If you'd sold it as an SF drama series where the dramatic focus could have been on Kirk's decisions and their consequences then you can leave him on the bridge and send others in his place. You can see the template for much of TNG in notes that Gerrold had put togther before 1972. )

    Regards,

    Joe
    Last edited by Joseph DeMartino; 12-28-2006, 08:50 PM.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X