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Sorry for being slow, the technomage quote

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  • Sorry for being slow, the technomage quote

    About wizards being subtle and quick to anger. I JUST last night understood he was quoting what an elf said in Lord of the Rings, crazy!
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  • #2
    There's another bitty taken from Lord of the Rings (spoken by Gandalf) that's spoken both by G'Kar and Galen: "Expect me when you see me."

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    • #3
      I think that one was more in the common vernacular than special to LoTR. My mother and father used to say that regularly and I guarantee that they never read Lord of the Rings. I've always liked that saying.

      Jan
      "As empathy spreads, civilization spreads. As empathy contracts, civilization contracts...as we're seeing now.

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      • #4
        The situation in which G'Kar gave the line in was so similar to Gandalf that I always took it as a nod to Tolkien though.
        Who are you?
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        • #5
          Don't forget the corollary: "Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup."

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          • #6
            Originally posted by moreorless
            The situation in which G'Kar gave the line in was so similar to Gandalf that I always took it as a nod to Tolkien though.
            And when Galen used it in Crusade it was even more obviously a nod to Professor T - especially given that Galen was a species of wizard hiimself.

            Regards,

            Joe
            Joseph DeMartino
            Sigh Corps
            Pat Tallman Division

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Phil Harmonic
              About wizards being subtle and quick to anger. I JUST last night understood he was quoting what an elf said in Lord of the Rings, crazy!
              Yeah, whom knew Technomages were intrested in humans Literature of 20th century.
              "We are the universe, trying to understand itself."

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              • #8
                Originally posted by EarthandBeyond
                Yeah, whom knew Technomages were intrested in humans Literature of 20th century.
                Well, the guy who said it - Elric - was human, so he'd probably know a bit about the old wizard lore of humans.
                Radhil Trebors
                Persona Under Construction

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                • #9
                  actully it does seem to be generally true of wizards in fantasy

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Joseph DeMartino
                    And when Galen used it in Crusade it was even more obviously a nod to Professor T - especially given that Galen was a species of wizard hiimself.

                    Regards,

                    Joe
                    I'v not read the B5 books but what I'v heard makes them even more similar as....

                    Book Spoiler

                    Both share a direct link to the "gods", the Technomages were created by the Shadows and the Wizards are Maia given human form.


                    Not sure if its intensional but Elrics "We are dreamers, shapers, singers, and makers" always struck me as rather similar to Tom Bombadil's "my making and my singing, my talking and my walking, and my watching of the country". Not an exact quote obviously but again the situations quite similar with apowerful individual explaining why he can't help the hero.
                    Last edited by moreorless; 12-23-2006, 08:40 AM.
                    Who are you?
                    What do you want?
                    What is the average inflight speed of an unladened swallow?

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                    • #11
                      It's a paraphrase from a poem called "Ode" by Arthur O'Shaughnessy:

                      We are the music-makers,
                      And we are the dreamers of dreams,
                      Wandering by lone sea-breakers,
                      And sitting by desolate streams;
                      World-losers and world-forsakers,
                      On whom the pale moon gleams:
                      Yet we are the movers and shakers
                      Of the world for ever, it seems.

                      With wonderful deathless ditties
                      We build up the world's great cities,
                      And out of a fabulous story
                      We fashion an empire's glory:
                      One man with a dream, at pleasure,
                      Shall go forth and conquer a crown;
                      And three with a new song's measure
                      Can trample an empire down.

                      We, in the ages lying
                      In the buried past of the earth,
                      Built Nineveh with our sighing,
                      And Babel itself with our mirth;
                      And o'erthrew them with prophesying
                      To the old of the new world's worth;
                      For each age is a dream that is dying,
                      Or one that is coming to birth.


                      Some of you may also recognize some of the lines from "Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory." When the children are licking the nursery wallpaper and Willy Wonka is telling them about the flavors, he says, "...the snozzberries are real snozzberries." Veruca replies indignantly, "There's no such thing as snozzberries!" Willy squishes her face in his hand, turns her to him, and says, "We are the music makers; and we are the dreamers of dreams." A great moment.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by AmyG
                        It's a paraphrase from a poem called "Ode" by Arthur O'Shaughnessy:
                        Yeah I'v heard that mentioned before although I'v not actually read the text, seems quite similar in style to the direct poem quotes we did see.

                        Ulysses was an interesting one aswell since it described the situation in both LOTR and B5 pretty well.
                        Who are you?
                        What do you want?
                        What is the average inflight speed of an unladened swallow?

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                        • #13
                          I'm not sure how well "Ulysses" applies to The Lord of the Rings (unless by "LotR", you meant the Rangers pilot, which is even less of a fit) but it would have worked a lot better with Babylon 5 if Sinclair had remained the lead for all five years.

                          Tho' much is taken, much abides; and though
                          We are not now that strength which in old days
                          Moved earth and heaven; that which we are, we are;
                          One equal temper of heroic hearts,
                          Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will
                          To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.


                          Those lines go much better with the notion of Sinclair returning 20 years after the beginning of the story as an old man, ready to lead one last mission, embarking on one last heroic journey from which he knows he will never return.

                          The whole point of Tennyson's poem is that it takes up the story near the end of the hero's life, many years after the events that made him famous throughout the ancient world.

                          Sheridan also goes on a journey in the end, but it is a solitary one and of a different kind. Odysseus calls his old companions together and sets out to explorer for exploration's sake because he cannot stand the thought of simply aging and deteriorating at home. He'd rather meet death on the sea or at the hands of some enemy out in the world than in bed. Sheridan knows he's going to die, and very soon, and he departs just to revisit a few places that meant something to him, ensure that no one who loved him has to watch him die, and to add to his own legend and the mystique of the still-young Alliance. To make the other child he leaves behind stronger. That's a very different kettle of fish than Odysseus's act, more akin to the Minbari "going to sea" and accepting death than the Greek's racing off across the wine dark waters and daring Death to come find him.

                          Regards,

                          Joe
                          Joseph DeMartino
                          Sigh Corps
                          Pat Tallman Division

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Joseph DeMartino
                            I'm not sure how well "Ulysses" applies to The Lord of the Rings (unless by "LotR", you meant the Rangers pilot, which is even less of a fit) but it would have worked a lot better with Babylon 5 if Sinclair had remained the lead for all five years.

                            Tho' much is taken, much abides; and though
                            We are not now that strength which in old days
                            Moved earth and heaven; that which we are, we are;
                            One equal temper of heroic hearts,
                            Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will
                            To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.
                            Taken in isolation I'd say that section actually suits Lord of the Rings a little better as one of the central themes is decline, whether its the Elves, the Dwarves or the Numenoreans.
                            Who are you?
                            What do you want?
                            What is the average inflight speed of an unladened swallow?

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by moreorless
                              Taken in isolation I'd say that section actually suits Lord of the Rings a little better as one of the central themes is decline, whether its the Elves, the Dwarves or the Numenoreans.
                              been awhile since i read the silmarillian but arn't the elves the numenorians?

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